Feb
03
2009
0

Does Music Help Alzheimer’s Patients?

In my experience, I have seen music sooth the behavior of individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease. Music is the universal language, and it affects people in indifferent ways. Studies have shown that music is processed by the brain differently from other information. As a musician, I play a piano jazz hour in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. At Christmas, I played a jazz hour in a facility that has Alzheimer’s patients. At the beginning of my jazz hour, the residents were quite agitated. By the end of the hour, they were all seated and quietly listening. They were either bored to death by my music, or liked it and were actually soothed by it. I hope to believe they liked it. I play jazz standards, many of which were written in the 30′s and 40′s. Many of the residents, who otherwise have lost much cognition could tell me the name of the tune I was playing, and what the tune related to in their lives. I remember a study some time ago, with four men in their 80′s who had played together in a New Orleans style jazz band for over 50 years. Several of them did not recognize each other or know each other’s names. But, on the count of three, they all picked up their instruments and played “When The Saints Come Marching Home” perfectly. “White noise” is also calming to Alzheimer’s patients. I hope my music is not in that category. You can read more about Alzheimer’s in my publication entitled “The Alzheimer’s Legal Survival Kit“, and on my web site at www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com. Michael J. Young, Elder Law Attorney.

Written by mike in: Uncategorized |
Feb
02
2009
0

Are Hispanics at a higher risk of Alzheimers’s Disease?

Experts suggest that Hispanics may be more suseptible to Alzheimer’s Disease than the general population, according to a New York Times article entitled “Are Hispanics at a Greater Risk for Alzheimer’s Disease.” “>” http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/21/us/21alzheimers.html The article suggests that Hispanics may have more risk factors for developing dementia than other groups, and that a signigficant number appear to be getting Alzheimers’ earlier. In addition, the article suggests that language barriers may discourage family members from helping their older loved one who may have signs of dementia. I have prepared a publication entitled “The Alzheimer’s Legal Survival Kit” where I address Alzheimer’s disease and how the family can help cope with the disease. This publication and other information can be found on my web site at www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com