May
31
2017
0

California Still Has A 30 Month Look Back for Gifting

California still has the 30 Month Look Back Penalty Period for Gifting. There is a federal law known as the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA), which has a 60 month look back penalty period. However, California has not to date implemented that law. Medi-Cal eligibility workers are required to use the 30 month look back period.

When you apply for Medi-Cal, the application asks whether you have given away any countable, or non-exempt assets within the last 30 months. If you have made such a gift without consideration, or for less than fair market value within the 30 months prior to making the application, a penalty period of ineligibility may be imposed. Transfers of any kind between spouses are exempt and do not create any periods of ineligibility.

The penalty transfer amount, which is also known as the monthly average nursing home private pay rate, is presently $8,515. The penalty period starts when the transfer is made, as opposed to when you make the Medi-Cal application. To calculate the penalty period, first check to see if it was made more than 30 months prior to making the Medi-Cal application. If more than 30 months have passed, there is no penalty.

Lets assume however that you have gifted $50,000 to your grandchild on October 1, 2016, and that you are applying for Medi-Cal on January 1, 2017. The gift was made 3 months prior to the application, so the 30 month look back penalty rule applies. You then divide $50,000 by $8,515, which reflects 5.87, which is rounded down to 5 months of ineligibility, starting from the date of the transfer. As a result, you would be ineligible for Medi-Cal during the months of October, when the gift was made, November, December, January and February, but you would be eligible March 1, 2017. There are of course other rules to consider, which may be to your benefit, which your elder law attorney can help you with.

Please feel free to contact our office should you need help with applying for Medi-Cal, and asset protection. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jan
02
2015
0

Treatment of The Home With Reverse Mortgages By Medi-Cal

Under the Medi-Cal regulations, it is fairly easy for us to establish the home as an “exempt asset” for qualification for Medi-Cal. The usual way is to confirm “an intent to return home” by the Medi-Cal applicant. The next task is to protect the home from a Medi-Cal lien if you pass away after having been on Medi-Cal. If you die after having been on Medi-Cal, and you are still on title to the home, Medi-Cal can put a lien on your home to recover the payments they have made to the nursing home. If you are not on title to the home when you die, Medi-Cal cannot pursue recoupment against your home. After we confirm the home as an “exempt asset”, we can transfer the home to another person without penalty under the Medi-Cal regulations. You can always transfer the home to your spouse without penalty. The goal is to keep the home as a legacy in your estate without it going to the state.

If you have a reverse mortgage on your home, it may become difficult for you to transfer title of the home to another person without triggering the due on transfer clause under the mortgage. This means that the loan could be due and payable upon the transfer. Also, if you go into a nursing home for an extended period of time, the reverse mortgage can become due and payable, and the home could be sold under the terms of the reverse mortgage. Any proceeds from the sale that you realize may make you ineligible for Medi-Cal benefits.

A reverse mortgage on your home is sometimes a good option for the older person. However, please keep in mind that it may not be such a good option if you could go into a nursing home in the foreseeable future. You should seek the advice of your elder law attorney for a full discussion of protecting the home, before committing to a reverse mortgage.

For additional information, you can contact your elder law attorney Michael J. Young. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the law offices of Michael J. Young, 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA http://www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com, 925-256-0298,lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice elder law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with Sustainable Estate Planning TM, long term care planning, asset protection plans, special needs trusts, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order to help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension Benefit.

Mar
25
2014
0

Consider Naming a Professional Fiduciary In Your Estate Planning Documents

When we prepare our estate planning documents, such as the Revocable Living Trust and Financial Durable Powers of Attorney, we typically name our spouses and then our children as our fiduciaries if we cannot act for ourselves. It would seem that the most common reason that would cause a fiduciary to act is the loss of mental capacity of the principal. For instance, in the case of a Revocable Living Trust for a husband and wife, they will name each other as a co-trustees. If neither of them can act because of incapacity, the children who have been named as successor trustees, will step up to act as trustee. With a Financial Durable Power of attorney, the couple will typically name each other as attorney in fact, and if they cannot act for each other, the children who have been named as successor attorneys in fact, will step up to act.

Many of our clients however do not have a living spouse or children or even siblings who can be named as fiduciaries for them. In addition, statistics show that at lease a quarter of persons in the  age group of 80 years or older, have significant clinical cognitive impairment. These individuals will need a responsible fiduciary to help manage and preserve their assets for them, and to help ensure that they receive good care as they age.

So for people who really have no one to name as a fiduciary in their estate planning documents, we recommend naming a professional fiduciary. These individuals are licensed by the State of California Professional Fiduciaries Bureau.  A professional fiduciary as successor trustee of a revocable living trust for instance, will carry out the terms of the trust while you are alive, and then finish the trust administration when you die.  During your lifetime, the professional fiduciary as successor trustee under your trust, or as your attorney in fact under your financial power of attorney,  will manage your checking account, pay your bills and otherwise help to protect your assets. They will make sure that your assets are used for your care and that your assets are preserved and managed for as long as possible. Many older people are vulnerable to scammers and even family members who will try to take advantage of them, and take their money.

We can recommend several very good professional fiduciaries who you could consider naming as successor fiduciaries  in your estate planning documents.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Nov
04
2013
0

Peace of Mind Now For Baby Boomers and Seniors Facing Retirement

A big issue now facing Baby Boomers and seniors is, surviving in retirement. We should have our “Ducks In A Row” now regarding health and financial issues, and there are many things we can do.

 Most of our clients do not have long term care insurance to pay for a stay in a nursing home. If they do, the policy would probably not pay the full cost. Fortunately however, California has Medi-Cal, which will pay for a stay in a nursing home provided that you qualify. You can now set up a long term care plan through your elder law attorney, as part of your estate plan, to provide for asset protection and qualification for Medi-Cal. For veterans, the plan will also help for qualification for the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit to help pay for in home care and assisted living facilities. Your plan will also confirm your overall desires regarding how your assets will be spent for your care at home and otherwise. If you lose capacity, your loved ones will have the authority to follow through with your plan.

 The home is often our clients’ largest asset. You can take steps now through your estate planning documents to assure that your home will pass to your loved ones as a legacy, without a Medi-Cal lien, so that the state will not be able to recoup the nursing home payments it has made for you.

 Many Baby Boomers’ do not have sufficient savings to live on through retirement. The stock market has hurt many portfolios in the past. Fortunately however, Social Security is still in existence. Some analysts say that the program can pay for benefits for the next 25 years for the general populace. There also seems to be a consensus of opinion, that any changes in the law should not affect Baby Boomers, and that the fund will be available for them. Although you can begin taking benefits at age 62, this could be a 25% reduction of what you would receive if you waited until you are 66. If you wait until age 70, this could raise your benefit by 8%, so wait longer if possible.

 For additional peace of mind, you can change your life style just a little bit, and try to keep more of what your earn. I recommend reading The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley in this regard. Stanley gives examples of how changing your lifestyle somewhat, and giving up certain luxuries, will allow you to put more money into your retirement accounts on an ongoing basis.

 This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Oct
08
2013
0

What Can The State Recover After I Die?

If you die after having been on Medi-Cal, the State will try to recover from your estate what they have paid out for your benefit. If there is nothing left in your estate, there is nothing for the State to take. If your home is still in your estate when you die, it could be subject to State revocery. Your revocable living trust does not protect your home from State recovery.  If you transferred your home prior to your death, following the Medi-Cal regulations, it would not be subject to recovery by the State upon your death.  If you transferred your home and reserved an irrevocable life estate, the home would not be in your estate when you die, and not subject to recovery. The life estate would disappear upon your death, and the State does not pursue recovery against reserved irrevocable life estates.

The State will not pursue recovery against the surviving spouse of a deceased Medi-Cal beneficiary. After the surviving spouse dies however, the State can pursue recovery against any property received by the surviving spouse through distribution or survival from the Medi-Cal beneficiary spouse.

If the Medi-Cal recipient is survived by a minor child under the age of 21, or if there is a blind or disabled child of any age who survives the Medi-Cal beneficiary, there can be no claim for recoupment by the State.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Oct
08
2013
0

IRAs and Medi-Cal Qualification

The Medi-Cal applicant can have any amount of IRAs that are in his name, and still qualify for Medi-Cal. For instance, the applicant could have $200,000 or more in his name in IRAs, and still be eligible for Medi-Cal. IRAs and work related pension funds are also exempt from Medi-Cal qualification. The only requirement is that the Medi-Cal applicant must be receiving periodic payments of interest and principal from the IRA. If you are receiving minimum required distributions (RMDs) under the IRS rules from your IRAs, then you have probably satisfied this requirement.

In addition, the IRAs owned by the well spouse of a Medi-Cal applicant are also exempt for Medi-Cal qualification. The IRAs owned by the well spouse are also not included as part of the community spouse resource allowance (CSRA). The CSRA, or the amount the well spouse can retain is $115,920.

After the Medi-Cal applicant dies, the State cannot recover from his IRAs or from his work-related pension funds, provided that a pay on death beneficiary is named. If the beneficiary of the IRA is the estate of the applicant, the State may be able to recover against the fund. Beneficiary designations on IRAs and other assets should be reviewed as part of the long term care planning process with your elder law attorney.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Sep
30
2013
0

I Thought My Revocable Living Trust Protected My Assets from Medi-Cal

Many people who call our office are under the belief that because they have a revocable living trust, that their assets are exempt from Medi-Cal qualification. They also believe that their revocable living trust protects their assets from a Medi-Cal lien from recovery to the State after they die. Both notions are incorrect.

When qualifying for Medi-Cal, all assets in the name of the applicant, including those in the applicant’s revocable living trust, are counted. If assets are held in a revocable living trust created by a husband and a wife, all of the assets in the trust are counted towards qualification, whether the applicant is the husband or the wife. If you pass away after having been on Medi-Cal, all assets in your revocable living trust are subject to recovery. If there are no assets in your revocable living trust when you die, there can be no recovery against the trust.

In order to gets your “Ducks In a Row” for possible Medi-Cal qualification and protections of assets, your revocable living trust should be updated so that it contains the requisite asset protection and government benefits planning language. In the event of your incapacity, this language will allow your fiduciary, usually your spouse or another loved one, to gift assets or transmute (transfer) assets, pursuant to the Medi-Cal regulations and California law, in order to qualify for Medi-Cal. The majority of revocable living trusts do not contain this language.

If you have an irrevocable trust, the assets in that trust may or may not be counted toward Medi-Cal qualification. And, the assets in the irrevocable trust may or may not be protected from a Medi-Cal lien after you die. The irrevocable trust should be examined by a qualified elder law attorney in order to make that determination.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jul
19
2013
0

Baby Boomers Predict The Future!

Baby Boomers Predict The Future!

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to predict the future for us Baby Boomers, and start planning for it! But we do know certain things about our future …

  •  On average, 10,000 people are turning age 65 every day.
  • It is predicted that at least 70% of people over age 65 will need long-term care services.
  • Currently, the median cost of long-term care for one year in the United States is $83,950.00.
  • In 30 years, when the last of the Boomers reach age 65, the price of long-term care is expected to be at an all time high of $190,000 per year.
  • Currently, the average amount of time a person needs long term care is 2.7 years.

 As my grandson would say, “OMG!”

As a senior estate planning attorney, and a Baby Boomer, we need to ask ourselves what we can do to plan for our long term care. GE Long Term Care Insurance conducted a study and found that nursing home costs are rising at a rate of 5% every year, outpacing inflation. With the rapidly growing elderly population this is the simple law of supply and demand.

 So, what can we do to prepare for the second half of life? If you or your spouse are age 65 and one of you goes into a nursing home, do you have a spare $513,000 lying around to pay for your or your spouse’s care.

 We still have Medi-Cal in California, which pays for the cost of a skilled nursing facility. The VA Aid & Attendance Pension benefit is still available to help pay for in home care and assisted living facility costs.

But you need to “get your ducks in a row” ahead of time to plan for qualification for these benefits. For starters, Baby Boomers are now taking advantage of modern asset protection and government benefits planning qualification techniques, which are incorporated into their estate planning documents. Also, one of our main goals is to preserve our homes for our children, without a lien for payback to Medi-Cal. With the modern language in your estate planning documents, if you become incapacitated, your spouse or loved one can follow through with qualification and asset protection techniques under the Medi-Cal and VA regulations.  

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your senior estate planning attorney before attempting any of these techniques. 

At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jul
01
2013
0

VA Aid & Attendance 2013 Pension Benefit Amounts

The 2013 Maximum Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit Rates are set forth below. This is a wonderful benefit for older wartime veterans, which can help pay for the cost of in-home care, assisted living facilities and board and care. The benefit is “non service connected”, which means that qualification is not dependent upon a wartime injury.

The veteran must typically have served ninety days of active duty, one day of which was during an offical wartime period. The veteran cannot have had a dishonorable discharge. The veteran’s physician must declare the veteran as in need of assistance from another individual and in need of a “Protective Environment”, which may include services offered by a care facility or company.

You should discuss with your elder law attorney how to make the A&A Pension Benefit part of your long term care planning.

BENEFIT AMOUNTS:

Single Veteran         $1,732.00 Per Month or $20,795.00 Per Year

Married Veteran      $2,054.00 Per Month of $24,652.00 Per Year

Surviving Spouse $1,113.00 Per Month or $32,114.00 Per Year

Veteran Married to Veteran (Both A & A) $2,676.00 Per Month or $32,114.00 Per Year.

At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney regarding any planning.

Apr
01
2013
0

Now Is The Time To Plan For Incapacity

My mother, who was a WWII veteran and the mother of five wild boys and a composed girl, used to tell me that the only thing that she really feared in life was losing her mental capacity. When I was a younger attorney, and my parents were younger, I prepared their estate plan, which was the typical plan designed for what happens when you die. When my parents got older and began to suffer the maladies of older people, I prepared a new estate plan for them, with a focus on not so much what would happen when they died, but on what would happen if they did not die, became ill and needed help with their care. My parents were adamant about having a plan that left something, especially their home, to their six children.

Estate planning and planning for mental capacity issues is very different for the older client. As a baby boomer, and after having helped take care of my aging parents, and after counseling many older clients and their families, my perspective as an estate planning attorney has changed over the years, and is now geared toward setting up a plan for the care of my clients, and protection of their assets, as well as planning for when they die.

Incapacity involves the inability of someone to make decisions regarding their personal and financial affairs. For many of our clients, diseases such as Parkinson’s and  Alzheimer’s have lead to mental incapacity. For other clients, there has been an event causing a brain injury leading to mental capacity. Many of our clients have dementia with no disease related diagnosis. Our recommendation is that anyone who is a baby boomer or older, should have an updated estate plan with an emphasis on asset protection and government benefits planning. You should also plan on how you or your fiduciary can get your ducks in a row to be able to protect your assets, such as your home, and obtain Medi-Cal to pay for your nursing home care, and the VA Aid and Attendance Pension Benefit to help pay the cost of in home care and assisted living facilities if needed.

You will need to decide who will be able to manage your financial affairs if you cannot. These individuals are usually trusted family members, but can also be friends. They can also be professional fiduciaries, who are licensed by California’s professional fiduciary bureau. You will also need to decide on who will make decisions for your regarding your health care, if you cannot do so. One issue to decide is whether you want to be on life support machines if you are in an irreversible condition and are only being kept alive by machines.

Michael J. Young, your elder law attorney in Walnut Creek, CA can help you design a plan to meet your needs as you get older. The plan will involve getting your ducks in a row for asset protection and government benefits planning. There are many options that your senior law attorney can help you with. Keep in mind that if you lose your mental capacity and what to protect assets by way of transferring your assets to your spouse or children, as is allowed under the regulations, you will not be able to do so if you have a traditional estate plan. In that case, we may have to go to court to amend your estate planning documents to provide for asset protection.

The information contained herein is not to be taken as legal advise, and you are advised to see your elder law attorney before attempting any planning or transfers of assets on your own. This article is written by elder law attorney Michael J. Young. Mr. Young, whose office is in Walnut Creek, CA is an elder law attorney, senior law attorney, Medi-Cal attorney and probate attorney whose office is in Walnut Creek, CA. Mr. Young is certified by the VA and is a member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA). For additional information, please visit our website at  www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com LawYoung1@Gmail.com Our address is at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Suite 220, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. 925-256-0298. Mr. Young serves Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, including the cities of Alamo, Walnut Creek, Concord, Danville, Pleasant Hill, Brentwood, Antioch, Clayton, etc. Mr. Young advises clients regarding Medi-Cal, Probates, Probates with Real Estate, Medi-Cal, nursing home costs, asset protection, the VA Aid and attendance pension benefit, and long term care planning. Mr. Young is an Elder Law Attorney and Probate Attorney with offices in Walnut Creek, CA. Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney, Walnut Creek Probate Attorney. Senior Law Attorney. Walnut Creek Medi-Cal attorney.

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