Mar
10
2015
0

Will Medi-Cal Let Me Make Gifts To My Wife Without Penalty?

Will Medi-Cal Let Me Make Gifts To My Wife Without Penalty?

YES!  For qualification for Medi-Cal, there is presently a 30 month look back period for making gifts. But this look back period does not apply between spouses. We have discussed in previous blogs how to properly transfer the home between spouses in order to avoid a state lien after the Medi-Cal recipient passes away. There is no penalty period for this transfer.

The ill spouse and the well spouse can both have any amounts of qualified funds, like IRAs, when qualifying for Medi-Cal. These are called “exempt assets.” The ill spouse can then have no more than $2,000 in regular or “non exempt” assets. The well spouse can have up to $119,220 in regular assets. So for qualification for Medi-Cal, the ill spouse will generally transfer her regular assets to the well spouse, so that the ill spouse has no more than $2,000 in regular assets.

If the well spouse then has more than $119,220 in regular assets, he can gift a portion of that amount to other individuals, to get him down to $119,220, but penalty periods can apply. Medi-Cal will ask if any assets have been gifted within 30 months prior to qualification for Medi-Cal from either spouse to other individuals. The gifts from the ill spouse to the well spouse do not create penalties. But any gifts to other individuals, like family members, can create penalty periods for qualification for Medi-Cal.

To figure out the penalty period, divide the amount of the gift by $7,628. The answer will give you the number of months of ineligibility for Medi-Cal. So, if $35,000 is gifted from mother to son within the last 30 months, that amount is divided by $7,628. The solution is 4.58 (rounded down to 4) months of ineligibility. So if the gift was made in October 2014, the Medi-Cal applicant would not be eligible for Medi-Cal until February 2015. Your elder law attorney can help you lower the months of ineligibility caused by gifting, through long term care planning. Do not attempt any transfers without the advice of your elder law attorney.

Your elder law attorney will help you to increase the quality of your life, and not just figure out who-gets-what after you pass away. For additional information, you can contact your elder law attorney Michael J. Young. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are advised to see your elder law attorney. At the law offices of Michael J. Young, 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA http://www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com, 925-256-0298,lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice elder law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with Sustainable Estate Planning TM, long term care planning, asset protection plans, special needs trusts, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order to help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension Benefit.

Jan
20
2014
0

7 Practical Considerations To Take Into Account When Choosing an Assisted Living Facility

Here are 7 Practical Considerations to take into account when you are choosing an assisted living facility, either for yourself or a loved one. We have developed this list  after having first hand experience with assisted living facilities that my father lived in, and after having interacted with our clients regarding these issues over many years.

  1. Is the facility well regarded in the community? Has it been recommended to you by someone who has had a loved one or friend there?
  2. Would the friends and family members of the resident be able to visit at any time, or are there restrictions in this regard?
  3. Is the facility in close proximity to the hospital and medical offices that the resident may need to visit?
  4. How were you treated by the staff and the administrator when you visited the facility? Did you feel welcome and were you comfortable with the experience?
  5. Were all of your questions answered satisfactorily when you visited the facility? Were you left in doubt or were you confused about any of their answers?
  6. Did you feel that you or your loved one would fit into the community for an extended period of time?
  7. Could you imaging yourself or your loved one living there?

* This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Nov
04
2013
0

Peace of Mind Now For Baby Boomers and Seniors Facing Retirement

A big issue now facing Baby Boomers and seniors is, surviving in retirement. We should have our “Ducks In A Row” now regarding health and financial issues, and there are many things we can do.

 Most of our clients do not have long term care insurance to pay for a stay in a nursing home. If they do, the policy would probably not pay the full cost. Fortunately however, California has Medi-Cal, which will pay for a stay in a nursing home provided that you qualify. You can now set up a long term care plan through your elder law attorney, as part of your estate plan, to provide for asset protection and qualification for Medi-Cal. For veterans, the plan will also help for qualification for the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit to help pay for in home care and assisted living facilities. Your plan will also confirm your overall desires regarding how your assets will be spent for your care at home and otherwise. If you lose capacity, your loved ones will have the authority to follow through with your plan.

 The home is often our clients’ largest asset. You can take steps now through your estate planning documents to assure that your home will pass to your loved ones as a legacy, without a Medi-Cal lien, so that the state will not be able to recoup the nursing home payments it has made for you.

 Many Baby Boomers’ do not have sufficient savings to live on through retirement. The stock market has hurt many portfolios in the past. Fortunately however, Social Security is still in existence. Some analysts say that the program can pay for benefits for the next 25 years for the general populace. There also seems to be a consensus of opinion, that any changes in the law should not affect Baby Boomers, and that the fund will be available for them. Although you can begin taking benefits at age 62, this could be a 25% reduction of what you would receive if you waited until you are 66. If you wait until age 70, this could raise your benefit by 8%, so wait longer if possible.

 For additional peace of mind, you can change your life style just a little bit, and try to keep more of what your earn. I recommend reading The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley in this regard. Stanley gives examples of how changing your lifestyle somewhat, and giving up certain luxuries, will allow you to put more money into your retirement accounts on an ongoing basis.

 This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Oct
08
2013
0

What Can The State Recover After I Die?

If you die after having been on Medi-Cal, the State will try to recover from your estate what they have paid out for your benefit. If there is nothing left in your estate, there is nothing for the State to take. If your home is still in your estate when you die, it could be subject to State revocery. Your revocable living trust does not protect your home from State recovery.  If you transferred your home prior to your death, following the Medi-Cal regulations, it would not be subject to recovery by the State upon your death.  If you transferred your home and reserved an irrevocable life estate, the home would not be in your estate when you die, and not subject to recovery. The life estate would disappear upon your death, and the State does not pursue recovery against reserved irrevocable life estates.

The State will not pursue recovery against the surviving spouse of a deceased Medi-Cal beneficiary. After the surviving spouse dies however, the State can pursue recovery against any property received by the surviving spouse through distribution or survival from the Medi-Cal beneficiary spouse.

If the Medi-Cal recipient is survived by a minor child under the age of 21, or if there is a blind or disabled child of any age who survives the Medi-Cal beneficiary, there can be no claim for recoupment by the State.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Oct
08
2013
0

IRAs and Medi-Cal Qualification

The Medi-Cal applicant can have any amount of IRAs that are in his name, and still qualify for Medi-Cal. For instance, the applicant could have $200,000 or more in his name in IRAs, and still be eligible for Medi-Cal. IRAs and work related pension funds are also exempt from Medi-Cal qualification. The only requirement is that the Medi-Cal applicant must be receiving periodic payments of interest and principal from the IRA. If you are receiving minimum required distributions (RMDs) under the IRS rules from your IRAs, then you have probably satisfied this requirement.

In addition, the IRAs owned by the well spouse of a Medi-Cal applicant are also exempt for Medi-Cal qualification. The IRAs owned by the well spouse are also not included as part of the community spouse resource allowance (CSRA). The CSRA, or the amount the well spouse can retain is $115,920.

After the Medi-Cal applicant dies, the State cannot recover from his IRAs or from his work-related pension funds, provided that a pay on death beneficiary is named. If the beneficiary of the IRA is the estate of the applicant, the State may be able to recover against the fund. Beneficiary designations on IRAs and other assets should be reviewed as part of the long term care planning process with your elder law attorney.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jul
30
2013
0

Alzheimer’s Is A Family Illness!

Our office represents many families who have a loved one who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. We typically will receive a call from the spouse or child of the person suffering from dementia. The person calling may tell us that their spouse or parent has become forgetful, is not paying the bills or that he is very depressed. On other occasions, we are told that their loved one is “acting out” and is doing unusual things, such as putting their socks on their hands instead of their feet, or are wandering off and getting lost.

Alzheimer’s disease and dementia definitely creates an extremely stressful time for the entire family. The fortunate victims of this disease have spouses and family members who can help them through their ordeal. Keep in mind also, that you do not have to handle this alone, and that help is available to you. The first thing that should be done is to have a physician give your loved one a complete physical examination. The examination should include neurological testing, medical history, lab tests, function tests and brain imaging. The examination results can determine whether the symptoms are temporary, and could show that the behavior of your loved one is caused by depression, poor nutrition, drug interaction or alcohol abuse. If the symptoms are permanent, they could be caused by dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. If the diagnosis is Alzheimer’s disease, you can also consult with a geriatric psychiatrist who can help with behavioral issues. If you need help finding a doctor, you can check with a physician’s referral service. Also, if you participate in caregiver support meetings, you can ask the other participants at the meetings.

Your elder law attorney can also be helpful to you to plan the elder care journey for the loved one who is suffering from dementia and their family. We meet with families, and help get the family’s “ducks in a row” from a legal and estate planning perspective. We can give advice on asset protection and qualification for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit. The families we meet with derive a great deal of peace of mind from these meetings.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and older clients and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers, older clients and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order to help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

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Jul
01
2013
0

VA Aid & Attendance 2013 Pension Benefit Amounts

The 2013 Maximum Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit Rates are set forth below. This is a wonderful benefit for older wartime veterans, which can help pay for the cost of in-home care, assisted living facilities and board and care. The benefit is “non service connected”, which means that qualification is not dependent upon a wartime injury.

The veteran must typically have served ninety days of active duty, one day of which was during an offical wartime period. The veteran cannot have had a dishonorable discharge. The veteran’s physician must declare the veteran as in need of assistance from another individual and in need of a “Protective Environment”, which may include services offered by a care facility or company.

You should discuss with your elder law attorney how to make the A&A Pension Benefit part of your long term care planning.

BENEFIT AMOUNTS:

Single Veteran         $1,732.00 Per Month or $20,795.00 Per Year

Married Veteran      $2,054.00 Per Month of $24,652.00 Per Year

Surviving Spouse $1,113.00 Per Month or $32,114.00 Per Year

Veteran Married to Veteran (Both A & A) $2,676.00 Per Month or $32,114.00 Per Year.

At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney regarding any planning.

Jun
10
2013
0

2013 CA Medi-Cal Quick Reference Guide

The State of California has changed some of the Medi-Cal qualification figures and requirements for 2013. A brief listing of these changes and requirements is set forth below:

2013 CA Medi-Cal Quick Reference Guide

Community Spouse Resource Allowance

$115,920

This is the amount that the community, or (at home) well spouse can retain in liquid assets. This amount does not include exempt assets, such as the home and qualified accounts, such as IRA’s.

Minimum Monthly Maintenance Needs Allowance

$2,898

This is the minimum amount of income the well spouse can keep. 

Average Private Pay Rate (Divestment Penalty Divisor)

$7,549

This is the amount the State pays to nursing homes on the Medi-Cal program, minus a share of cost by the applicant. This figure is also used to calculate penalty periods of ineligibility for Medi-Cal.

Applicant Resource Allowance

$2,000

The applicant can keep this amount in cash, checking, etc.

Monthly Personal Needs Allowance

$35

The amount of income the ill person is allowed to keep.

At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney regarding any planning.

May
31
2013
0

Baby Boomer Alert!

You should get your “Ducks In A Row” now. Many of us Baby Boomers, born between 1946 and 1964, have helped to take care of our elderly parents. Both of my parents are gone now, but my siblings and I helped our parents through their “Elder Care Journey,” which I talk about in my workshops. We helped our parents, the best that we could, with issues concerning their illnesses, memory issues, trips to and from the hospital and trips to and from nursing homes. We helped to get in-home-care for them, and helped to get them into assisted living facilities and a board and care home. Finally, both parents passed away while on hospice.

 I remember my brother Charles saying to me early on regarding helping our parents, that “This isn’t getting any easier.” And I remember thinking to myself that it won’t be that much longer, in the scheme of things, before my wife and I, who are both Baby Boomers, could need care. We want to make things as easy as possible for our children to help care for us.

 The first thing Baby Boomers should do is check their estate planning documents, including their revocable living trust and financial durable powers of attorney, to be sure that the proper asset protection and government benefits language is in the documents. The boiler plate language in the majority of estate planning documents will not help in these areas if you lose mental capacity. If the language is not there, and you lose mental capacity, your family may have to resort to going to court to reform your documents, which can be costly.

 With proper long term care planning, which starts with your estate planning documents, Medi-Cal could be accessed to pay for nursing home stays if you use up your Medi-Care days. And, there techniques you can use to protect the home from a Medi-Cal lien, which can be specified in your estate planning documents. In addition, the VA Aid and Attendance Pension Benefit is there to help older war time veterans, and this benefit can be used to help pay for in home care and assisted living facility costs. Proper language in your estate planning documents will make it much easier for your children to follow through with your care and to access these benefits, especially if you lose your mental capacity. 

At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

 This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney regarding any planning.

Apr
22
2013
0

Start Walking for Your Health!

People are living longer and are enjoying healthier lives for longer periods of time. George Burns, who lived to be 100 said, “I’m going to stay in show business until I’m the last one left!” I see attorney friends at the courthouse who are over 80. When I talk to them, I discover that they have no intention of retiring. Mickey Mantle once said, “If I knew I was going to live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself.” This is a funny line, but by exercising, we can expect to live long and productive lives.

 A report by the American College of Sports Medicine says that by the year 2030, there will be more than 70,000,000 people in this country who are over the age of 65. And, the fastest growing segment of the population will be people who are over age 85! But, we want to be healthy as we grow older.  

 Walking has been reported to be the easiest exercise to do, which also has the greatest benefits. According to a report by the Mayo Clinic, you can literally walk your way to fitness and good health. Several reports say that by merely walking 45 minutes per day, you can maintain a healthy weight, control blood pressure and type 2 diabetes, strengthen your skeletal system and improve your coordination and balance. Walking also helps to elevate your mood.

 You can easily create a walking routine. My wife walks around the Lafayette reservoir with her friends two times a week. They don’t go around the reservoir once, but two times! I am trying to catch up with her with my walking routine, by walking to downtown Walnut Creek and back for lunch every day. If I stretch it, I can have a 45 minute round trip walk. I believe that in the future, I will be one of the attorneys at the court house who is over 80, and in great shape!

 At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, located in Walnut Creek, Ca, we talk about the Elder Care Journey with our clients, and in our workshops. Over the years, we have helped many families, and we can help you too with long-term care planning, asset protection plans, assistance with Medi-Cal and the VA, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney.

 Michael J. Young, Attorney at Law, is an estate planning attorney and Medi-Cal qualification attorney in Walnut Creek, CA. For additional information, please visit our website at  www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com LawYoung1@Gmail.com Our address is at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Suite 220, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. 925-256-0298. Mr. Young serves Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, including the cities of Alamo, Walnut Creek, Concord, Danville, Pleasant Hill, Brentwood, Antioch, Clayton, etc. Mr. Young advises clients regarding Medi-Cal, Probates, Probates with Real Estate, Medi-Cal, nursing home costs, asset protection, the VA Aid and attendance pension benefit, and long term care planning. Mr. Young is an Elder Law Attorney and Probate Attorney with offices in Walnut Creek, CA. Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney, Walnut Creek Probate Attorney. Senior Law Attorney. Walnut Creek Medi-Cal attorney. Mr. Young is certified by the VA and is a member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA).

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