Mar
02
2018
0

How Long Does A Probate Usually Take?

Probate proceedings typically take about a year to complete, and can take even longer depending on the assets and complexities of the case. After the petition is filed, notices are given and probate publication is made. Probate statutory time frames must be adhered to, and apply to various aspects of the probate, including filing dates, publication and creditors’ claims. If there are creditors’ claims against the estate, the probate can take even longer in order to resolve the claims. If beneficiaries contest certain aspects of the probate, such as the amounts of distributions and which parties are to receive which distributions, the probate proceeding could take even longer. Real estate can be sold during the course of a probate administration, even though the probate is being contested. When real property is sold during the course of a probate proceeding, the proceeds of sale are distributed from escrow to the probate bank account, pending completion of the probate proceeding.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

Mar
01
2018
0

Items Generally Exempted for Medi-Cal Qualification

If you apply for Medi-Cal, the following list includes items that are generally exempted for qualification.

  • Your home is exempted if it is your principal residence. When applying for Medi-Cal, you will confirm on the application that you intend to return home after your stay in a skilled nursing facility. Medi-Cal requires a “subjective intent in writing to return home” to establish the home as an exempt asset. We have our clients execute an “intent to return home” form when we prepare their asset protection estate plans.
  • IRAs, 401k’s and other “qualified accounts” are exempt. The applicant however must be taking RMD’s or some amount of principal and interest on a periodic basis.
  • Not more than $2,000 in cash in the applicant’s name, which could include savings and checking accounts.
  • One care is exempt. If a couple owns two cars, we request an exemption for the more expensive car.
  • Term life insurance is exempt, but whole life insurance cannot have more than $1500 cash value.
  • Burial plots are exempt, and prepaid irrevocable burial plans are exempt.
  • Qualified or work related annuities are generally exempt. Other annuities may be exempt according to the Medi-Cal regulations.
  • Household furnishings are exempt.

This list is not exhaustive, and this information is not to be taken as legal advice. You are encouraged to see your elder law and probate attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, probate avoidance, wills, trusts, powers of attorney and probates. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek Elder Law

Elder Law, Asset Protection,

Medi-Cal and Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

Feb
07
2018
0

The Probate Spousal Property Petition

Assets that pass to a surviving spouse can be confirmed to the surviving spouse, through a petition process in probate court. This is not a full probate, and is called a “Spousal Property Petition”. This petition process usually takes around two months to complete, as opposed to around a year that is needed to complete a full probate. California Probate Code § 13500 provides for this petition process. The petition can be filed by a surviving spouse or surviving domestic partner. If a will exists, and the only beneficiary named in the will is the surviving spouse, then the property will pass to the surviving spouse. If the will lists other beneficiaries in addition to the surviving spouse, then only the property listed in the will that goes to the surviving spouse is subject to the petition. If there is no will, the community property can also be passed to the surviving spouse through the “Spousal Property Petition.” For the spousal property petition, the probate court will require that the probate form “1-DE-221, Spousal Property Petition”, be completed and signed by the surviving spouse. The petition will need to be supplemented with an explanation as to why the subject property should pass to the surviving spouse.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

May
31
2012
0

Probates with Real Estate –

PROBATE is a court proceeding that is used to distribute your assets to your beneficiaries at the time of your death. Probates are complex, and require that numerous forms and regulations be followed, before the court will sign an order distributing your assets to your beneficiaries or heirs. 

A probate with regard to your home and other real estate assets can usually be avoided with the use of revocable living trusts. To do this, title to your home would be transfered on the County Record from yourself, to yourself as trustee under your revocable living trust. For instance, the deed would be from John Doe to John Doe as Trustee of the John Doe Revocable Living Trust dated January 15, 2012. The terms of the trust will state who the home will be distributed to after you die, and this transfer can be completed on the County Record without a probate. 

However, not everybody passes away with their home in a revocable living trust. There are many occasions where individuals will pass away with their home in their name alone, and they may or may not have a will. A probate will probably be required whether they have a will or not. The terms of the will determine who the beneficiaries of the home will be. If there is no will, the home will be distributed to the “heirs at law” of the decedent.

With regard to real estate, a probate is required to clear the title so that the property can be distributed to the beneficiaries or heirs of the decedent, or so that the property can be sold and the proceeds of sale distributed to the beneficiaries or heirs. Clients will ask me why a probate would be required if the decedent has a will naming somebody as a beneficiary. To find the answer to this, we first need to first look at the County Record to see who the record owner is for the home. The last deed of record could be in the name of John Doe. John Doe is now deceased, so who can sign a deed from John Doe to his beneficiary? The answer is no one, which is why a court order would be required.

Written Michael J. Young, elder law attorney and probate attorney in Walnut Creek, CA and former in-house counsel for title insurance companies. www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com LawYoung1@Gmail.com 1931 San Miguel Dr., Suite 220, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. 925-256-0298. Mr. Young serves Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, including the cities of Walnut Creek, Alamo, Danville, Concord, Brentwood, Pleasant Hill, Antioch, Clayton, etc. Mr. Young advises clients regarding Probates, Probates with Real Estate, Medi-Cal, nursing homes, asset protection, the VA Aid and attendance pension benefit, and long term care planning. Mr. Young is an Elder Law Attorney and Probate Attorney with offices in Walnut Creek, CA. Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney, Walnut Creek Probate Attorney

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