Mar
08
2018
0

What Assets Can Be Administered By The Probate Court When The Decedent’s Will Is Filed?

Only certain assets left through a person’s will can be administered through a probate proceeding.

For a married person, all of his or her separate property, which is in that person’s name alone, can be distributed through a probate court proceeding. Separate property is identified as what was owned by the decedent before marriage. In addition, separate property refers to assets acquired during marriage by gift or inheritance. If the decedent is single, all assets in the decedent’s name alone can be distributed through a probate proceeding. For community property, one-half of each asset which is titled in the couple’s names as community property can be handled through the probate court process. In addition, the portion or percent owned by the decedent with others as tenants in common can be subject to the probate court process. Assets that are not registered in the decedent’s name, such as furniture, coins and jewelry can also be distributed through probate.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, is general in nature, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

Mar
02
2018
0

How Long Does A Probate Usually Take?

Probate proceedings typically take about a year to complete, and can take even longer depending on the assets and complexities of the case. After the petition is filed, notices are given and probate publication is made. Probate statutory time frames must be adhered to, and apply to various aspects of the probate, including filing dates, publication and creditors’ claims. If there are creditors’ claims against the estate, the probate can take even longer in order to resolve the claims. If beneficiaries contest certain aspects of the probate, such as the amounts of distributions and which parties are to receive which distributions, the probate proceeding could take even longer. Real estate can be sold during the course of a probate administration, even though the probate is being contested. When real property is sold during the course of a probate proceeding, the proceeds of sale are distributed from escrow to the probate bank account, pending completion of the probate proceeding.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

Mar
02
2018
0

What Happens To A Mortgage During Probate?

Many probates involve real estate where a mortgage or loan, is secured by a deed of trust which is recorded against title of the subject real property. Properly recorded mortgages survive the death of the borrower/owner of the property, and remain as liens against the real property through probate. As a result, mortgages are not subject to probate creditors’ claims and time limits requirements for making a claim against probate. If a mortgage is not paid off during probate administration, the lender may eventually foreclose against the real property, even during the course of a probate proceeding. The probate administrator is not required to pay off the loan through probate. It is important to communicate with the lender through the course of the probate. If the lender knows that the subject real property is being marketed for sale during the probate, the lender will usually hold off on foreclosing, pending sale of the real property through the probate proceeding.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

Feb
08
2018
0

Proposition 58 Property Tax Exclusion -Transfer Between Parent and Child

A property tax re-assessment of the home in a transfer from a parent to a child can be avoided under California Proposition 58. For instance, when a probate is closed and the home is transferred to a child, or if the home is transferred to a child through trust administration, we can complete the “Claim For Reassessment Exclusion For Transfer Between Parent To Child.” If accepted by the assessor, the child who receives title to the real property through probate or the trust, can retain the parents’ old tax basis. Under Proposition 58, a son, daughter, child adopted before the age of 18, son-in-law, daughter–in-law and step-child, can be identified as the child. This re-assessment exclusion can be very valuable. For instance, the parents may have purchased their home some years ago for $85,000, and then leave their home to their daughter through probate or trust administration. When the parents die, their home could be worth $1,000,000. By utilizing Proposition 58, after the close of probate or trust administration, the daughter should be able to continue to pay property tax on the parents’ original tax basis of $85,000.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney, Michael J. Young.

Michael J. Young, Attorney at Law

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

May
31
2017
0

California Still Has A 30 Month Look Back for Gifting

California still has the 30 Month Look Back Penalty Period for Gifting. There is a federal law known as the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA), which has a 60 month look back penalty period. However, California has not to date implemented that law. Medi-Cal eligibility workers are required to use the 30 month look back period.

When you apply for Medi-Cal, the application asks whether you have given away any countable, or non-exempt assets within the last 30 months. If you have made such a gift without consideration, or for less than fair market value within the 30 months prior to making the application, a penalty period of ineligibility may be imposed. Transfers of any kind between spouses are exempt and do not create any periods of ineligibility.

The penalty transfer amount, which is also known as the monthly average nursing home private pay rate, is presently $8,515. The penalty period starts when the transfer is made, as opposed to when you make the Medi-Cal application. To calculate the penalty period, first check to see if it was made more than 30 months prior to making the Medi-Cal application. If more than 30 months have passed, there is no penalty.

Lets assume however that you have gifted $50,000 to your grandchild on October 1, 2016, and that you are applying for Medi-Cal on January 1, 2017. The gift was made 3 months prior to the application, so the 30 month look back penalty rule applies. You then divide $50,000 by $8,515, which reflects 5.87, which is rounded down to 5 months of ineligibility, starting from the date of the transfer. As a result, you would be ineligible for Medi-Cal during the months of October, when the gift was made, November, December, January and February, but you would be eligible March 1, 2017. There are of course other rules to consider, which may be to your benefit, which your elder law attorney can help you with.

Please feel free to contact our office should you need help with applying for Medi-Cal, and asset protection. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Dec
17
2015
0

Beware of Arbitration Clauses

The New York Times has examined, in a series of articles, the problems with mandatory arbitration agreements in consumer contracts. The articles examine “… how clauses buried in tens of thousands of contracts have deprived Americans of one of their most fundamental constitutional rights: their day in court.”

The NY Times series discusses how consumers are often, unknowingly, forced to have their disputes heard by business-friendly arbitrators, without the benefit of courts or judges. As a result, the claim resolution may end with business biased results, without accountability through the justice system.

Unfortunately, nursing homes usually have arbitration clauses in their admission agreements. When the resident signs an agreement upon admission that has an arbitration provision, the resident agrees to give up their constitutional right to have a dispute decided in court, with a judge and jury. This arbitrator’s decision is final, binding, and with no right to appeal.  Arbitration is expensive, with the arbitrator receiving between $400 and $1,000 an hour for his time. Also, studies have shown that arbitrators have a pro-business bias, and that consumers receive less money from arbitration awards, than through the court process.

It is illegal under California law to force a prospective nursing home resident to sign an arbitration agreement as a condition of admission. Also, the state requires that the arbitration agreement be separate and apart from the admission agreement. So, the best way to preserve your right to the judicial system is to not sign the arbitration agreement. Our financial powers of attorney do not give powers to the attorney in fact to sign an agreement for binding arbitration.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Apr
28
2014
0

Special Needs Trust & Inheritance & Workshop 5-8-2014

Special Needs Trusts and Inheritance:

Q: Our father just passed away and left $400,000 in his revocable living trust to myself and my brother. My brother is on SSI and will lose his benefit when he receives the inheritance. What should we do?

 A. There is a remedy for this problem when someone dies, and their revocable living trust does not have a special needs trust provision for a special needs beneficiary. Under the law, the revocable living trust became irrevocable when your father died. As a result, it is too late for you to amend the trust to include a Special Needs Trust for your brother.

 However, the California Probate Code does allow the Court to amend the trust to include a special needs trust upon a petition to the Court from the special needs beneficiary. The special needs beneficiary files a petition with the court requesting that the trust be modified to include a special needs trust for himself for his part of the inheritance. Your brother, who will be the petitioner, will tell the court in the petition that had your father gone to an elder law attorney who would have advised your father about the addition to his revocable living trust of a special needs trust for your brother, that your father would have requested that addition.

The courts have been willing to grant these petitions. After the court signs its order for the modification of your father’s trust, the inheritance for your brother will flow into his new Special Needs Trust and he will not lose his public benefits. Your Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney can advise you and help you in the preparation of a petition for the modification of a revocable living trust after the maker of the trust dies.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, special needs trusts, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Nov
04
2013
0

Peace of Mind Now For Baby Boomers and Seniors Facing Retirement

A big issue now facing Baby Boomers and seniors is, surviving in retirement. We should have our “Ducks In A Row” now regarding health and financial issues, and there are many things we can do.

 Most of our clients do not have long term care insurance to pay for a stay in a nursing home. If they do, the policy would probably not pay the full cost. Fortunately however, California has Medi-Cal, which will pay for a stay in a nursing home provided that you qualify. You can now set up a long term care plan through your elder law attorney, as part of your estate plan, to provide for asset protection and qualification for Medi-Cal. For veterans, the plan will also help for qualification for the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit to help pay for in home care and assisted living facilities. Your plan will also confirm your overall desires regarding how your assets will be spent for your care at home and otherwise. If you lose capacity, your loved ones will have the authority to follow through with your plan.

 The home is often our clients’ largest asset. You can take steps now through your estate planning documents to assure that your home will pass to your loved ones as a legacy, without a Medi-Cal lien, so that the state will not be able to recoup the nursing home payments it has made for you.

 Many Baby Boomers’ do not have sufficient savings to live on through retirement. The stock market has hurt many portfolios in the past. Fortunately however, Social Security is still in existence. Some analysts say that the program can pay for benefits for the next 25 years for the general populace. There also seems to be a consensus of opinion, that any changes in the law should not affect Baby Boomers, and that the fund will be available for them. Although you can begin taking benefits at age 62, this could be a 25% reduction of what you would receive if you waited until you are 66. If you wait until age 70, this could raise your benefit by 8%, so wait longer if possible.

 For additional peace of mind, you can change your life style just a little bit, and try to keep more of what your earn. I recommend reading The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley in this regard. Stanley gives examples of how changing your lifestyle somewhat, and giving up certain luxuries, will allow you to put more money into your retirement accounts on an ongoing basis.

 This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Oct
08
2013
0

What Can The State Recover After I Die?

If you die after having been on Medi-Cal, the State will try to recover from your estate what they have paid out for your benefit. If there is nothing left in your estate, there is nothing for the State to take. If your home is still in your estate when you die, it could be subject to State revocery. Your revocable living trust does not protect your home from State recovery.  If you transferred your home prior to your death, following the Medi-Cal regulations, it would not be subject to recovery by the State upon your death.  If you transferred your home and reserved an irrevocable life estate, the home would not be in your estate when you die, and not subject to recovery. The life estate would disappear upon your death, and the State does not pursue recovery against reserved irrevocable life estates.

The State will not pursue recovery against the surviving spouse of a deceased Medi-Cal beneficiary. After the surviving spouse dies however, the State can pursue recovery against any property received by the surviving spouse through distribution or survival from the Medi-Cal beneficiary spouse.

If the Medi-Cal recipient is survived by a minor child under the age of 21, or if there is a blind or disabled child of any age who survives the Medi-Cal beneficiary, there can be no claim for recoupment by the State.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Oct
08
2013
0

IRAs and Medi-Cal Qualification

The Medi-Cal applicant can have any amount of IRAs that are in his name, and still qualify for Medi-Cal. For instance, the applicant could have $200,000 or more in his name in IRAs, and still be eligible for Medi-Cal. IRAs and work related pension funds are also exempt from Medi-Cal qualification. The only requirement is that the Medi-Cal applicant must be receiving periodic payments of interest and principal from the IRA. If you are receiving minimum required distributions (RMDs) under the IRS rules from your IRAs, then you have probably satisfied this requirement.

In addition, the IRAs owned by the well spouse of a Medi-Cal applicant are also exempt for Medi-Cal qualification. The IRAs owned by the well spouse are also not included as part of the community spouse resource allowance (CSRA). The CSRA, or the amount the well spouse can retain is $115,920.

After the Medi-Cal applicant dies, the State cannot recover from his IRAs or from his work-related pension funds, provided that a pay on death beneficiary is named. If the beneficiary of the IRA is the estate of the applicant, the State may be able to recover against the fund. Beneficiary designations on IRAs and other assets should be reviewed as part of the long term care planning process with your elder law attorney.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

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