May
31
2017
0

California Still Has A 30 Month Look Back for Gifting

California still has the 30 Month Look Back Penalty Period for Gifting. There is a federal law known as the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA), which has a 60 month look back penalty period. However, California has not to date implemented that law. Medi-Cal eligibility workers are required to use the 30 month look back period.

When you apply for Medi-Cal, the application asks whether you have given away any countable, or non-exempt assets within the last 30 months. If you have made such a gift without consideration, or for less than fair market value within the 30 months prior to making the application, a penalty period of ineligibility may be imposed. Transfers of any kind between spouses are exempt and do not create any periods of ineligibility.

The penalty transfer amount, which is also known as the monthly average nursing home private pay rate, is presently $8,515. The penalty period starts when the transfer is made, as opposed to when you make the Medi-Cal application. To calculate the penalty period, first check to see if it was made more than 30 months prior to making the Medi-Cal application. If more than 30 months have passed, there is no penalty.

Lets assume however that you have gifted $50,000 to your grandchild on October 1, 2016, and that you are applying for Medi-Cal on January 1, 2017. The gift was made 3 months prior to the application, so the 30 month look back penalty rule applies. You then divide $50,000 by $8,515, which reflects 5.87, which is rounded down to 5 months of ineligibility, starting from the date of the transfer. As a result, you would be ineligible for Medi-Cal during the months of October, when the gift was made, November, December, January and February, but you would be eligible March 1, 2017. There are of course other rules to consider, which may be to your benefit, which your elder law attorney can help you with.

Please feel free to contact our office should you need help with applying for Medi-Cal, and asset protection. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Dec
15
2014
0

Final Expense Trust For No Fee

As part of your long term care planning, you can also plan ahead for payment of funeral costs. You can put an amount you decide on into an “irrevocable final expense trust” which will pay for funeral and related costs at the time of your passing. The money you put into the final expense trust earns interest until the time the trust is used. If you pass away, your surviving loved ones do not start writing checks to the funeral home. They instead will take the final expense trust to any funeral home, and present it for payment for funeral and related services.

This part of pre-planning makes it much easier on your loved ones when you are gone, in that an amount for your funeral costs has been established, and the check has already been written and the funds are in the trust. There is no longer a need for your loved ones to scramble for funds for payment to the funeral home. The funds placed into the trust are protected by National Guarding Life (NGL), which uses a life insurance policy to fund the trust. With the use of the policy, the funds are not taxable upon your passing. The trust is also not subject to creditors’ claims because it is irrevocable. In addition, there is no legal fee for the creation of the trust, in that the trust is prepared by NGL.

The use of this type of trust can also be useful as part of Medi-Cal planning. When funded  properly, the money in the trust will not be counted for Medi-Cal eligibility, and will not be available for recoupment from the state. There is a wide range of related services that the fund in the trust can also be used for, such as clergy honorarium, death certificates, musicians, flowers, memoriam celebration, transportation equipment and driver. Any funds that are not used will go to your named beneficiary.

For additional information, you can contact your elder law attorney Michael J. Young. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the law offices of Michael J. Young, 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA http://www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com, 925-256-0298,lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice elder law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long term care planning, asset protection plans, special needs trusts, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order to help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension Benefit.

Jul
30
2013
0

Alzheimer’s Is A Family Illness!

Our office represents many families who have a loved one who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. We typically will receive a call from the spouse or child of the person suffering from dementia. The person calling may tell us that their spouse or parent has become forgetful, is not paying the bills or that he is very depressed. On other occasions, we are told that their loved one is “acting out” and is doing unusual things, such as putting their socks on their hands instead of their feet, or are wandering off and getting lost.

Alzheimer’s disease and dementia definitely creates an extremely stressful time for the entire family. The fortunate victims of this disease have spouses and family members who can help them through their ordeal. Keep in mind also, that you do not have to handle this alone, and that help is available to you. The first thing that should be done is to have a physician give your loved one a complete physical examination. The examination should include neurological testing, medical history, lab tests, function tests and brain imaging. The examination results can determine whether the symptoms are temporary, and could show that the behavior of your loved one is caused by depression, poor nutrition, drug interaction or alcohol abuse. If the symptoms are permanent, they could be caused by dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. If the diagnosis is Alzheimer’s disease, you can also consult with a geriatric psychiatrist who can help with behavioral issues. If you need help finding a doctor, you can check with a physician’s referral service. Also, if you participate in caregiver support meetings, you can ask the other participants at the meetings.

Your elder law attorney can also be helpful to you to plan the elder care journey for the loved one who is suffering from dementia and their family. We meet with families, and help get the family’s “ducks in a row” from a legal and estate planning perspective. We can give advice on asset protection and qualification for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit. The families we meet with derive a great deal of peace of mind from these meetings.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and older clients and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers, older clients and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order to help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Written by mike in: Aid & Attendance Antioch,Aid & Attendance Brentwood,Alzheimer's Care,Alzheimer's Medi-Cal,Antioch Elder Law Attorney,Antioch Nursing Homes,Baby Boomer Estate Planning,Baby Boomer Estate Planning,Brentwood Attorney Senior,Brentwood CA Asset Protection Attorney,Brentwood Elder Law Attorney,Brentwood Nursing Home Attorney,Brentwood Senior Law Attorney,CA Attorney Asset Protection,Concord Elder Law Attorney,Concord Medi-Cal Attorney,Concord Nursing Home Attorney,Concord Senior Law Attorney,Concord VA Attorney,Contra Costa Elder Law,Contra Costa Nursing Home Attorney,Elder Law Attorney Contra Costa,Elder Law Attorney Walnut Creek,Elder Law Estate Planning,Estate Planning Attorney Concord CA,Estate Planning for Baby Boomers,Hospice Care,Medi-Cal Attorney,Medi-Cal Attorney Brentwood,Medi-Cal Attorney Concord,Medi-Cal Attorney Pleasant Hill CA,Medi-Cal Attorney Walnut Creek CA,Medi-Cal Planning & Qualification,Medi-Cal attorney,Medi-Cal eligibility Concord CA,Nursing Home Attorney Walnut Creek,Pay Nursing Home Cost Concord,Pleasant Hill Elder Law Attorney,Pleasant Hill Senior Law Attorney,Probates with Real Estate,Qualification for VA Aid & Attendance,VA Attorney Walnut creek,Walnut Creek Elder Law,Walnut Creek Medi-Cal Qualification,aid and attendance,elder law,elder law attorney Pleasant Hill,parkinson's disease,senior law walnut creek | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Jul
19
2013
0

Baby Boomers Predict The Future!

Baby Boomers Predict The Future!

Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to predict the future for us Baby Boomers, and start planning for it! But we do know certain things about our future …

  •  On average, 10,000 people are turning age 65 every day.
  • It is predicted that at least 70% of people over age 65 will need long-term care services.
  • Currently, the median cost of long-term care for one year in the United States is $83,950.00.
  • In 30 years, when the last of the Boomers reach age 65, the price of long-term care is expected to be at an all time high of $190,000 per year.
  • Currently, the average amount of time a person needs long term care is 2.7 years.

 As my grandson would say, “OMG!”

As a senior estate planning attorney, and a Baby Boomer, we need to ask ourselves what we can do to plan for our long term care. GE Long Term Care Insurance conducted a study and found that nursing home costs are rising at a rate of 5% every year, outpacing inflation. With the rapidly growing elderly population this is the simple law of supply and demand.

 So, what can we do to prepare for the second half of life? If you or your spouse are age 65 and one of you goes into a nursing home, do you have a spare $513,000 lying around to pay for your or your spouse’s care.

 We still have Medi-Cal in California, which pays for the cost of a skilled nursing facility. The VA Aid & Attendance Pension benefit is still available to help pay for in home care and assisted living facility costs.

But you need to “get your ducks in a row” ahead of time to plan for qualification for these benefits. For starters, Baby Boomers are now taking advantage of modern asset protection and government benefits planning qualification techniques, which are incorporated into their estate planning documents. Also, one of our main goals is to preserve our homes for our children, without a lien for payback to Medi-Cal. With the modern language in your estate planning documents, if you become incapacitated, your spouse or loved one can follow through with qualification and asset protection techniques under the Medi-Cal and VA regulations.  

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your senior estate planning attorney before attempting any of these techniques. 

At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Mar
25
2013
0

Can The State Take My Home If I Die After Having Been On Medi-Cal?

One of the most frequently asked questions I receive as an elder law attorney in Walnut Creek, CA is, “Can the State of California take my home if I die after having been on Medi-Cal?”

 The state will not actually take your home. But your home, if it is in your estate when you die, can be subject to a claim by the state after your death for the amounts the state has paid for your care. This claim will be paid when your property is sold from your estate. The state can only recover for the amounts they have actually paid for your care. Presently the amount they can recover is $7,092 per month, minus the share of cost that you have contributed to a nursing home. This amount of course would be less than what you would have paid as a private pay patient in a nursing home.

 In order to establish your home as an exempt asset when you apply for Medi-Cal, you must confirm your intent to return home if you have entered a nursing home. There is a question on the Medi-Cal application which allows you to establish this intent.

 The state will not pursue a claim for reimbursement against a surviving spouse of a Medi-Cal recipient as long as she is still living in the property. When she dies, the state will pursue the claim against any assets she received from her spouse, including the home, if he was a Medi-Cal recipient. In addition, the state cannot pursue a claim against the home if the Medi-Cal recipient is survived by a minor, blind or disabled child.

 There are techniques allowed by the state for protection of the home from a claim after death. For instance, we can “transmute” or transfer the ill spouse’s interest in the home to the well spouse during his life, and reserve a life estate to the well spouse. We can also transfer the home from a single Medi-Cal recipient to his children, for instance, and reserve a life estate to the Medi-Cal applicant. Transfers such as these must be done correctly and pursuant to the regulations in order to avoid a state claim, and in order to avoid capital gains issues. Please be aware that there is no protection for the home if it is in the revocable living trust of the Medi-Cal recipient when he passes away. Asset protection planning must be accomplished while the Medi-Cal recipient has good mental capacity. Otherwise, we may have to go to court to correct the problem. Do not rely on the idea that your financial durable power of attorney and revocable living trust will allow you to make these transfers during mental incapacity. The estate planning documents require specialized language in order to do this, and most plans do not have the requisite language.

 Keep in mind that the state cannot make a claim against assets that are not in your estate when you die. You will need the help of your elder law attorney aka your asset protection attorney in order create a long term care and asset protection plan for you. 

 Written Michael J. Young, elder law attorney, Medi-Cal attorney, senior law attorney and probate attorney in Walnut Creek, CA and former in-house counsel for title insurance companies. Mr. Young is a Medi-Cal attorney and is VA Certified. He is a member of NAELA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com LawYoung1@Gmail.com 1931 San Miguel Dr., Suite 220, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. 925-256-0298. Mr. Young serves Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, including the cities of Walnut Creek, Alamo, Danville, Concord, Brentwood, Pleasant Hill, Antioch, Clayton, etc. Mr. Young advises clients regarding Probates, Probates with Real Estate, Medi-Cal, nursing homes, asset protection, the VA Aid and attendance pension benefit, and long term care planning. Mr. Young is an Elder Law Attorney and Probate Attorney with offices in Walnut Creek, CA. Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney, Walnut Creek Probate Attorney. Senior Law Attorney

Mar
18
2013
0

Getting Your Ducks In A Row Before a Crisis Occurs

You should get your ducks in a row long before a crisis occurs, especially where your health and finances are concerned. Many of our clients come to see us when a crisis is occurring. For instance, their spouse or loved one is in the hospital or has just entered a skilled nursing facility. At this stage the planning is usually more difficult, and we may be facing memory issues of the ill person. It may also be more difficult to preserve the home as a legacy for the clients’ beneficiaries. The home is many times our clients’ largest asset.

As part of long term care planning, we plan how various stages of care will be paid for and determine what assets and resources are available. We proceed to get our ducks in a row to protect assets. We also line our ducks up for obtaining Medi-Cal to pay for the skilled nursing facility and the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit to pay for in home care or an assisted living facility. Gifting and spending issues for Medi-Cal and VA are considered. The longer we have to do long term care planning, the easier it is for all concerned. In addition, your peace of mind can be assured earlier on. 

FAMILY DYNAMICS: When we are able to do pre-planning for our clients, we can better take into account issues concerning family dynamics. We need to know which family members are helping the ill person, and who can be relied upon when help is needed. We can offer suggestions for the well spouse for her care for the ill spouse when he comes home. We will be better able to find out if there is serious infighting and resentments among family members. When a crisis occurs, these dynamics become intensified.

LEGAL DOCUMENTS: Are the legal documents up to date? If they are, you are in a tiny minority. If you have not gone to an elder law attorney in the last several years, your documents are probably not up to date. There is specialized language that can be utilized for asset protection and for government benefits planning in the various documents. For instance, if we want to preserve the home and protect it from a Medi-Cal lien, and the ill person has severe memory issues, we may not be able to proceed to transfer the home to the well spouse or a child without going to court. Most revocable living trusts and financial durable powers of attorney do not contain this specialized asset protection language.

Pre-planning will also allow us to discuss any changes that may be needed in the trust, will, financial durable power of attorney and other estate planning documents. Family dynamics are always changing with the occurrence of deaths, divorces, children who are themselves in need of care, second marriages, etc.

Written Michael J. Young, elder law attorney, Medi-Cal attorney, senior law attorney and probate attorney in Walnut Creek, CA and former in-house counsel for title insurance companies. Mr. Young is a Medi-Cal attorney and is VA Certified.  www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com LawYoung1@Gmail.com 1931 San Miguel Dr., Suite 220, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. 925-256-0298. Mr. Young serves Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, including the cities of Walnut Creek, Alamo, Danville, Concord, Brentwood, Pleasant Hill, Antioch, Clayton, etc. Mr. Young advises clients regarding Probates, Probates with Real Estate, Medi-Cal, nursing homes, asset protection, the VA Aid and attendance pension benefit, and long term care planning. Mr. Young is an Elder Law Attorney and Probate Attorney with offices in Walnut Creek, CA. Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney, Walnut Creek Probate Attorney. Senior Law Attorney

Mar
11
2013
0

Can Mom Go On Hospice at Home?

Most of our clients make it well known in their long term care plans, that if they become ill, they wish to be taken care of at home for as long as possible. My parents made a pact with each other that if either of them had to go to “rehab”  as my mother called it, which is a skilled nursing facility, that they wanted to return home and be taken care of at home. My mother died at home under hospice care. Your elder law attorney can make these desires known in your elder care estate planning documents. In fact, at the Law Offices of Michael J. Young in Walnut Creek CA, we have our clients sign a separate “Intent To Return Home Document,” which states that if they have to go to a nursing home, it is always their intent to return to their home.

Most of our clients also make it known in their long term care planning documents that if they have a terminal illness, and they would only survivie by being hooked up to machines, that they would rather instead, be allowed to die with dignity, and not be hooked up to machines.

Many people do not know that hospice care can take place at home, and that hospice care professionals can come to your home. Hospice is also often paid for by Medicare or private insurance. To qualify for hospice, a physician must confirm that in their opinion, their patient is likely to die within a six month period. This is generally all that is required. I remember how relieved my siblings and I were when my mother was on hospice at home, and various nurses, social workers, doctors, priests and other aides came into my parents home to attend to my mother. All of us benefitted from this process. 

The hospice process allowed my mother, my dad, myself and my siblings to  to appreciate our last days together with my mother, outside of the traditional, more hectic hospital atmosphere.  

For more information about hospice, long term care planning, asset protection, Medi-Cal qualification and the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit, please feel free to contact Michael J. Young at The Law Offices of Michael J. Young in Walnut Creek, CA. www.youngelderlaw.com www.walnutcreekelderlaw.com

Written Michael J. Young, elder law attorney, Medi-Cal attorney, senior law attorney and probate attorney in Walnut Creek, CA and former in-house counsel for title insurance companies. Mr. Young is a Medi-Cal attorney and is VA Certified.  www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com LawYoung1@Gmail.com 1931 San Miguel Dr., Suite 220, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. 925-256-0298. Mr. Young serves Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, including the cities of Walnut Creek, Alamo, Danville, Concord, Brentwood, Pleasant Hill, Antioch, Clayton, etc. Mr. Young advises clients regarding Probates, Probates with Real Estate, Medi-Cal, nursing homes, asset protection, the VA Aid and attendance pension benefit, and long term care planning. Mr. Young is an Elder Law Attorney and Probate Attorney with offices in Walnut Creek, CA. Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney, Walnut Creek Probate Attorney. Senior Law Attorney

Mar
04
2013
0

Protect Your Home From a Medi-Cal Lien With a Reserved Life Estate

Medi-Cal can pay for your stay in a skilled nursing facility if you qualify. Under the state’s regulations, your home can be confirmed as an exempt asset in the Medi-Cal application. This means that you can keep your home, if you are otherwise qualified, and still receive Medi-Cal. This is true whether you are single or married. The concept is that you should not have to lose your home in order to receive this public benefit.

 The problem is that the state will want to recoup the payments it has made to the nursing home for your benefit, when you die. If your home is in your estate when you die, the state will put a lien on your home for the amount it has paid to the nursing home on your behalf. If the state has paid out $150,000 for you, they will put a lien on your home for that amount. When you die and your estate is settled, the state will be satisfied first for their lien of $150,000, and your beneficiaries will receive what is left. The state will not pursue a lien against a surviving spouse who still owns the home, but when she dies, the state’s lien will attach to the home and the state will recoup their payments at that time. 

There is a legal technique which is permitted under the regulations, which will allow you to protect your home against a Medi-Cal lien. It is called a “reserved life estate,” and your elder law attorney or senior law attorney can advise you in this regard. If the Medi-Cal applicant owns a home, we can transfer her interest in the home to her spouse, or to her children, for instance. A life estate in the home is reserved on the deed in favor of the Medi-Cal applicant. This means that the applicant owns the home for the rest of her life, and that her spouse or children own the remainder interest. The applicant is entitled to rents, issues and profits derived from the real estate. These interests are confirmed on the county record. When the Medi-Cal applicant dies, the home is not in her estate because her life interest disappears at the time of her death by operation of law, and her spouse or her children then receive the full interest in the property. Elder law planning and asset protection planning can be further pursued for the surviving spouse with your elder law attorney, to likewise protect her interest in the home.

Although under real estate law the home is not in the Medi-Cal applicant’s estate when she dies, so that a Medi-Cal lien cannot attach to the home, another benefit in using this technique is that under the IRS regulations, the reserved life estate interest should be recognized as keeping enough interest in her home in her estate, so that there should be a “step-up in basis” for capital gains purposes at the time of her death.  

If you have lost mental capacity at the time we would like to make a transfer of your interest in your home and reserve a life estate in your favor, we will need to look at the language and powers in your revocable living trust and financial durable power of attorney. If the powers are not there, and they usually are not, you may have to pursue a court petition through an elder law attorney who is familiar with this area of the law, in order to reform your documents to allow for this transfer. Most revocable living trusts and financial durable powers of attorney do not contain this favorable language. As a result people who are “baby boomer” age or older should consider getting their “Ducks In A Row” and have their elder law attorney or senior law attorney create an elder care plan for them, which will include estate planning documents with this favorable, asset protection language. An elder law attorney who is familiar with Medi-Cal qualification can certainly help you in this regard. Michael J. Young is an elder law attorney who practices in Walnut Creek, CA.

Written Michael J. Young, elder law attorney, Medi-Cal attorney, senior law attorney and probate attorney in Walnut Creek, CA and former in-house counsel for title insurance companies. He is Medi-Cal attorney and is VA Certified.  www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com LawYoung1@Gmail.com 1931 San Miguel Dr., Suite 220, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. 925-256-0298. Mr. Young serves Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, including the cities of Walnut Creek, Alamo, Danville, Concord, Brentwood, Pleasant Hill, Antioch, Clayton, etc. Mr. Young advises clients regarding Probates, Probates with Real Estate, Medi-Cal, nursing homes, asset protection, the VA Aid and attendance pension benefit, and long term care planning. Mr. Young is an Elder Law Attorney and Probate Attorney with offices in Walnut Creek, CA. Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney, Walnut Creek Probate Attorney. Senior Law Attorney

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May
31
2012
0

Probates with Real Estate –

PROBATE is a court proceeding that is used to distribute your assets to your beneficiaries at the time of your death. Probates are complex, and require that numerous forms and regulations be followed, before the court will sign an order distributing your assets to your beneficiaries or heirs. 

A probate with regard to your home and other real estate assets can usually be avoided with the use of revocable living trusts. To do this, title to your home would be transfered on the County Record from yourself, to yourself as trustee under your revocable living trust. For instance, the deed would be from John Doe to John Doe as Trustee of the John Doe Revocable Living Trust dated January 15, 2012. The terms of the trust will state who the home will be distributed to after you die, and this transfer can be completed on the County Record without a probate. 

However, not everybody passes away with their home in a revocable living trust. There are many occasions where individuals will pass away with their home in their name alone, and they may or may not have a will. A probate will probably be required whether they have a will or not. The terms of the will determine who the beneficiaries of the home will be. If there is no will, the home will be distributed to the “heirs at law” of the decedent.

With regard to real estate, a probate is required to clear the title so that the property can be distributed to the beneficiaries or heirs of the decedent, or so that the property can be sold and the proceeds of sale distributed to the beneficiaries or heirs. Clients will ask me why a probate would be required if the decedent has a will naming somebody as a beneficiary. To find the answer to this, we first need to first look at the County Record to see who the record owner is for the home. The last deed of record could be in the name of John Doe. John Doe is now deceased, so who can sign a deed from John Doe to his beneficiary? The answer is no one, which is why a court order would be required.

Written Michael J. Young, elder law attorney and probate attorney in Walnut Creek, CA and former in-house counsel for title insurance companies. www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com LawYoung1@Gmail.com 1931 San Miguel Dr., Suite 220, Walnut Creek, CA 94596. 925-256-0298. Mr. Young serves Contra Costa and Alameda Counties, including the cities of Walnut Creek, Alamo, Danville, Concord, Brentwood, Pleasant Hill, Antioch, Clayton, etc. Mr. Young advises clients regarding Probates, Probates with Real Estate, Medi-Cal, nursing homes, asset protection, the VA Aid and attendance pension benefit, and long term care planning. Mr. Young is an Elder Law Attorney and Probate Attorney with offices in Walnut Creek, CA. Walnut Creek Elder Law Attorney, Walnut Creek Probate Attorney

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