Sep
28
2016
0

Consider A Joint Checking Account With Your Parents

Many older people insist on handling their own financial affairs without assistance, for as long as as possible. This is admirable, but what if something bad happens to the older person, like a medical event which lands the older person in the hospital, and ready access to cash is needed? And, what if the older person begins to lose capacity and starts to make bad decisions with their money?

For access to immediate cash, a child or other loved one should be a joint owner on a checking account with the older person. If the older person is hospitalized and indisposed for a period of time, the child will be able to take care of finances, and pay bills for their parent. If the older person starts to make bad financial decisions, or is the subject of fraud, the child could shut the account down.

The bank and financial accounts, except for IRAs, should be transferred to the revocable living trust of the older person, with a child or other person named as successor trustee. These transfers to the revocable living trust are completed through the bank or financial institution, and these trust assets are reflected on the schedules of assets attached to the revocable living trust. The trust is set up so that if the older person loses capacity, a doctor’s note is obtained, and the child can act as the new trustee to control the assets for the benefit of the parent.

But what if the parent refuses to cooperate and do any of these things? You should try to maintain a dialogue of communication with the parent, and try to stay informed about what is happening with his daily life. If the parent becomes unusually defensive when asked about his finances, this should be a red flag. At this point, a geriatric social worker may be able to help you communicate with your parent. If the estate plan and finances aren’t properly set up, and the parent loses mental capacity, a court conservatorship may be required for you to be able to gain control of the accounts. The earlier the estate plan and joint checking account is set up, the easier it will be for all concerned.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Written by mike in: Aid & Attendance Brentwood,Alzheimer's Care,Alzheimer's Medi-Cal,Asset Protection Attorney Walnut Creek,Baby Boomer Estate Planning,Baby Boomer Estate Planning,Brentwood Attorney Senior,Brentwood CA Asset Protection Attorney,Brentwood Elder Law,Brentwood Elder Law Atorney,Brentwood Elder Law Attorney,Brentwood Nursing Home Attorney,Brentwood Senior Law Attorney,Contra Costa Nursing Home Attorney,Elder Law Attorney Walnut Creek,Estate Planning for Baby Boomers,Hospice Care Walnut Creek,Medi-Cal Attorney Pleasant Hill CA,Medi-Cal Attorney Walnut Creek,Medi-Cal Attorney Walnut Creek CA,Medi-Cal Gifting Walnut Creek,Medi-Cal Planning & Qualification,Nursing Home Attorney Brentwood,Nursing Home Attorney Walnut Creek,Parkinson's disease Walnut Creek,Pay Nursing Home Care Walnut Creek,Pay for Cost of Long Term Care Walnut Creek,Pleasant Hill Elder Law Attorney,Pleasant Hill Senior Law Attorney,Probate Attorney Contra Costa County,Senior Law Attorney Walnut Creek,Special Needs Trusts,Sustainable Estate Planning Walnut Creek CA,Walnut Creek Elder Law,Walnut Creek Medi-Cal Qualification,elder law attorney Pleasant Hill,senior law walnut creek | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Feb
01
2016
0

How Much Does The Surviving Spouse Receive In Social Security Benefits?

In a previous post, we discussed what you should do about Social Security benefits after someone dies. But with regard to married couples, how much will the surviving spouse receive? Generally speaking, the surviving spouse will receive 100% of the deceased spouse’s Social Security benefit, as long as that amount is greater than the surviving spouse’s benefit.  As a result, the surviving spouse will continue to receive either his or her own benefit, or the deceased spouse’s benefit, whichever is greater. But, the surviving spouse will not receive both benefits.  A one-time death benefit payment of $255 will also be paid to the surviving spouse by Social Security.

Another requirement is that the surviving spouse must be age 60 or older. The surviving spouse can also be 50 or older provided that he or she is disabled from a disability that began no later than 7 years after the deceased spouse’s death. The surviving spouse must also have been married to the deceased spouse for at least 9 months, and not be currently remarried where the marriage occurred before he/she turned age 60.

An ex-spouse may also collect survivor benefits under certain circumstances.  The ex-spouse must have been married to the deceased ex-spouse at least 10 years.  The age 60 or age 50 with a disability requirements as discussed above, are the same as the married surviving spouse.  Also, the ex-spouse must not be remarried in a marriage that occurred before age 60. Be sure to contact Social Security with regard to your specific case. An in-person meeting at the Social Security office is the best way for you to proceed.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jan
25
2016
0

Plan For Incapacity Now

Planning for incapacity should take place now, while you still have good mental capacity. If you lose mental capacity, you will not be able to make good decisions regarding your financial and personal affairs. For seniors, incapacity can occur for instance, as the result of a head trauma, dementia or as a consequence of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

If you have not planned properly for incapacity, your loved ones or friends may not be able to help pay your bills and make financial and health care decisions for you. In addition, your loved ones and friends may not be able to protect your assets and help you qualify for Medi-Cal or the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit.

You should also decide now who you would trust to make financial decisions for you, and who you would trust to make health care decisions for you. These can be different people.

Your elder law and asset protection attorney will help you set up a Long Term Care Plan to handle these issues in the event you lose capacity. Your Long Term Care Plan will direct how your assets will be distributed when you die. And if you don’t die, and become ill, your Long Term Care Plan will provide directions for your long term care, will help preserve your assets and “get your ducks in a row” for asset protection and your qualification for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jan
02
2015
0

Treatment of The Home With Reverse Mortgages By Medi-Cal

Under the Medi-Cal regulations, it is fairly easy for us to establish the home as an “exempt asset” for qualification for Medi-Cal. The usual way is to confirm “an intent to return home” by the Medi-Cal applicant. The next task is to protect the home from a Medi-Cal lien if you pass away after having been on Medi-Cal. If you die after having been on Medi-Cal, and you are still on title to the home, Medi-Cal can put a lien on your home to recover the payments they have made to the nursing home. If you are not on title to the home when you die, Medi-Cal cannot pursue recoupment against your home. After we confirm the home as an “exempt asset”, we can transfer the home to another person without penalty under the Medi-Cal regulations. You can always transfer the home to your spouse without penalty. The goal is to keep the home as a legacy in your estate without it going to the state.

If you have a reverse mortgage on your home, it may become difficult for you to transfer title of the home to another person without triggering the due on transfer clause under the mortgage. This means that the loan could be due and payable upon the transfer. Also, if you go into a nursing home for an extended period of time, the reverse mortgage can become due and payable, and the home could be sold under the terms of the reverse mortgage. Any proceeds from the sale that you realize may make you ineligible for Medi-Cal benefits.

A reverse mortgage on your home is sometimes a good option for the older person. However, please keep in mind that it may not be such a good option if you could go into a nursing home in the foreseeable future. You should seek the advice of your elder law attorney for a full discussion of protecting the home, before committing to a reverse mortgage.

For additional information, you can contact your elder law attorney Michael J. Young. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the law offices of Michael J. Young, 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA http://www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com, 925-256-0298,lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice elder law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with Sustainable Estate Planning TM, long term care planning, asset protection plans, special needs trusts, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order to help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension Benefit.

May
20
2014
0

Hiring Home Health Aides:

As part of the Elder Care Journey as we call it, many of our clients will eventually need in-home-care. Our clients want to stay at home but will need help with various activities of daily living, such as eating, bathing, dressing, ambulating and toileting. In fact, our estate planning documents usually confirm an intent to remain home for care for our clients, and an intent to return home after a stay in a skilled nursing facility. The issue then becomes whether you should hire the in-home-care aide through a home care agency or should you hire the aide directly.

Please keep in mind that the aide who will be helping your Mother for instance, will be coming into your Mother’s home, and will be left alone in the home with her for long periods of time. You should avoid risks regarding the aide as best as you can. Health Care Agencies pre-qualify their aides, and do background checks before hiring. Their aides are also bonded. Most of our clients and their families maintain a better comfort level and peace of mind when they hire an aide through a health care agency.

With regard to proof of spending issues for qualification for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit, the fact that you are using an agency creates a much smoother application process. The agreement you have with the agency and proof of payment to them is usually sufficient proof for Medi-Cal and VA. When cash payments are made to an individual, who may also be undocumented, it is much more difficult to obtain these benefits.

Another issue to be concerned with is the IRS and who does the tax reporting and wage withholding for wages paid to the aide. If you are hiring an aide through an agency, you do not face these additional issues. I am not sure that the IRS would become involved, but you have enough to worry about, dealing with the issues of being older and needing care, without worrying about the IRS.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, special needs trusts, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Mar
25
2014
0

Consider Naming a Professional Fiduciary In Your Estate Planning Documents

When we prepare our estate planning documents, such as the Revocable Living Trust and Financial Durable Powers of Attorney, we typically name our spouses and then our children as our fiduciaries if we cannot act for ourselves. It would seem that the most common reason that would cause a fiduciary to act is the loss of mental capacity of the principal. For instance, in the case of a Revocable Living Trust for a husband and wife, they will name each other as a co-trustees. If neither of them can act because of incapacity, the children who have been named as successor trustees, will step up to act as trustee. With a Financial Durable Power of attorney, the couple will typically name each other as attorney in fact, and if they cannot act for each other, the children who have been named as successor attorneys in fact, will step up to act.

Many of our clients however do not have a living spouse or children or even siblings who can be named as fiduciaries for them. In addition, statistics show that at lease a quarter of persons in the  age group of 80 years or older, have significant clinical cognitive impairment. These individuals will need a responsible fiduciary to help manage and preserve their assets for them, and to help ensure that they receive good care as they age.

So for people who really have no one to name as a fiduciary in their estate planning documents, we recommend naming a professional fiduciary. These individuals are licensed by the State of California Professional Fiduciaries Bureau.  A professional fiduciary as successor trustee of a revocable living trust for instance, will carry out the terms of the trust while you are alive, and then finish the trust administration when you die.  During your lifetime, the professional fiduciary as successor trustee under your trust, or as your attorney in fact under your financial power of attorney,  will manage your checking account, pay your bills and otherwise help to protect your assets. They will make sure that your assets are used for your care and that your assets are preserved and managed for as long as possible. Many older people are vulnerable to scammers and even family members who will try to take advantage of them, and take their money.

We can recommend several very good professional fiduciaries who you could consider naming as successor fiduciaries  in your estate planning documents.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jan
20
2014
0

7 Practical Considerations To Take Into Account When Choosing an Assisted Living Facility

Here are 7 Practical Considerations to take into account when you are choosing an assisted living facility, either for yourself or a loved one. We have developed this list  after having first hand experience with assisted living facilities that my father lived in, and after having interacted with our clients regarding these issues over many years.

  1. Is the facility well regarded in the community? Has it been recommended to you by someone who has had a loved one or friend there?
  2. Would the friends and family members of the resident be able to visit at any time, or are there restrictions in this regard?
  3. Is the facility in close proximity to the hospital and medical offices that the resident may need to visit?
  4. How were you treated by the staff and the administrator when you visited the facility? Did you feel welcome and were you comfortable with the experience?
  5. Were all of your questions answered satisfactorily when you visited the facility? Were you left in doubt or were you confused about any of their answers?
  6. Did you feel that you or your loved one would fit into the community for an extended period of time?
  7. Could you imaging yourself or your loved one living there?

* This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Oct
08
2013
0

What Can The State Recover After I Die?

If you die after having been on Medi-Cal, the State will try to recover from your estate what they have paid out for your benefit. If there is nothing left in your estate, there is nothing for the State to take. If your home is still in your estate when you die, it could be subject to State revocery. Your revocable living trust does not protect your home from State recovery.  If you transferred your home prior to your death, following the Medi-Cal regulations, it would not be subject to recovery by the State upon your death.  If you transferred your home and reserved an irrevocable life estate, the home would not be in your estate when you die, and not subject to recovery. The life estate would disappear upon your death, and the State does not pursue recovery against reserved irrevocable life estates.

The State will not pursue recovery against the surviving spouse of a deceased Medi-Cal beneficiary. After the surviving spouse dies however, the State can pursue recovery against any property received by the surviving spouse through distribution or survival from the Medi-Cal beneficiary spouse.

If the Medi-Cal recipient is survived by a minor child under the age of 21, or if there is a blind or disabled child of any age who survives the Medi-Cal beneficiary, there can be no claim for recoupment by the State.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers and families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Jul
01
2013
0

VA Aid & Attendance 2013 Pension Benefit Amounts

The 2013 Maximum Aid & Attendance Pension Benefit Rates are set forth below. This is a wonderful benefit for older wartime veterans, which can help pay for the cost of in-home care, assisted living facilities and board and care. The benefit is “non service connected”, which means that qualification is not dependent upon a wartime injury.

The veteran must typically have served ninety days of active duty, one day of which was during an offical wartime period. The veteran cannot have had a dishonorable discharge. The veteran’s physician must declare the veteran as in need of assistance from another individual and in need of a “Protective Environment”, which may include services offered by a care facility or company.

You should discuss with your elder law attorney how to make the A&A Pension Benefit part of your long term care planning.

BENEFIT AMOUNTS:

Single Veteran         $1,732.00 Per Month or $20,795.00 Per Year

Married Veteran      $2,054.00 Per Month of $24,652.00 Per Year

Surviving Spouse $1,113.00 Per Month or $32,114.00 Per Year

Veteran Married to Veteran (Both A & A) $2,676.00 Per Month or $32,114.00 Per Year.

At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law and we help families through the Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney regarding any planning.

May
01
2013
0

Be Patient With Seniors

A lot of us Baby Boomers have either helped take care of our elderly parents, or are presently doing so. The process of taking care of an older person who is ill can be difficult, and the circumstances never become easier. We must remember though to always slow down, and to maintain our patience with our older loved ones while in our care roles.

 I remember when I was a teenager with my driver learner’s permit, at age 15 ½, I was driving with my father in his car. I stopped at a stop sign, and I expressed exasperation about an older man who was slowly crossing the street with his cane, and holding up a long line of cars. My father scolded me, pointed toward the old man and said, “Michael, that man is you, very soon!” At the time it was difficult for me to relate to my father’s comment, but I will never forget it.

 As Baby Boomers, we are extremely busy with our lives. We are usually operating at warp speed and are always multi tasking. Our demeanor and our speech often reflect our impatience with the lack of swiftness at which the world around us is responding to our expectations. In order to be good care givers when dealing with our older loved ones, we must substantially slow down.

 Communications can be difficult, but do not need to be so. When we are speaking with our older loved ones, we must be in the moment with them. As difficult as this may sound, the cell phone should be turned off and put away. We need to listen carefully and respectfully to what our older loved ones are saying and what they are asking. If they become angry, do not react with anger. Try to envision yourself at their age and in their circumstances. As my father would say, “That person is you.”     

 At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com we practice Elder Law. We help families through the Elder Law minefield, and have been helping family members to better communicate with each other. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help families get their ducks in a row in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

 This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney regarding any planning.

Powered by WordPress | Theme: Aeros 2.0 by TheBuckmaker.com