Mar
08
2018
0

What Assets Can Be Administered By The Probate Court When The Decedent’s Will Is Filed?

Only certain assets left through a person’s will can be administered through a probate proceeding.

For a married person, all of his or her separate property, which is in that person’s name alone, can be distributed through a probate court proceeding. Separate property is identified as what was owned by the decedent before marriage. In addition, separate property refers to assets acquired during marriage by gift or inheritance. If the decedent is single, all assets in the decedent’s name alone can be distributed through a probate proceeding. For community property, one-half of each asset which is titled in the couple’s names as community property can be handled through the probate court process. In addition, the portion or percent owned by the decedent with others as tenants in common can be subject to the probate court process. Assets that are not registered in the decedent’s name, such as furniture, coins and jewelry can also be distributed through probate.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, is general in nature, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

Feb
12
2018
0

Avoid Probate To Avoid Medi-Cal Recovery

When a Medi-Cal recipient dies, the state will attempt to recover from the recipient’s estate, what the state paid for that person’s care during his or her lifetime. Before January 1, 2017, the term “estate” referred to any assets in the recipient’s name at the time of death. As of January 1, 2017, as the result of SB 833, which was signed into law by Governor Brown on June 27, 2016, the state has taken the definition of “estate” to mean a probate estate. A probate estate is an estate that is being processed through a court action in probate court. If you do not have an estate that is subject to probate when you die, there can be no state recovery. A revocable living trust will avoid probate. For instance, if you transfer your home to your revocable living trust and then you die, your home will be transferred to your named beneficiaries of the trust, without the need of a probate court action. If you do not transfer title of your home to your trust, and your name alone is on the deed, a probate of your home will be required when you die. The state could then recover against your home. If you hold title to your home in joint tenancy and then you die, title to your home will vest in the surviving joint tenant without a probate court action, and there will be no state recovery. However, on the death of the surviving joint tenant, a probate court proceeding will be required if the surviving person did not put title in a trust, or did not add another joint tenant to the deed. So the easiest way to avoid Medi-Cal recovery, is to avoid probate.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law and probate attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney and probates. We also help Baby Boomers and families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Feb
07
2018
0

The Personal Representative of the Probate Estate

When a probate is filed, the court will appoint a Personal Representative of the estate. This personal representative will be identified in the court proceeding as the executor or administrator of the estate. This person will sign and file the various documents that will be required by the court through the course of the probate proceeding. If there is a will naming an executor, the court will most likely name that individual as the executor of the estate. If there is no will, then the surviving spouse, the children of the decedent, parents, etc., can petition the court to be named as the “Administrator With Will Annexed.” The term “administrator” is also used when a person dies without leaving a will which would name an executor. If the executor named in the will has died or cannot serve for some reason, the court will appoint an administrator. If a former spouse is named in the decedent’s will as the executor, and there has since been a divorce, Probate Code § 6122 prevents the former spouse from serving as executor.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see Michael J. Yung, your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek Elder Law Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

Feb
07
2018
0

The Probate Spousal Property Petition

Assets that pass to a surviving spouse can be confirmed to the surviving spouse, through a petition process in probate court. This is not a full probate, and is called a “Spousal Property Petition”. This petition process usually takes around two months to complete, as opposed to around a year that is needed to complete a full probate. California Probate Code § 13500 provides for this petition process. The petition can be filed by a surviving spouse or surviving domestic partner. If a will exists, and the only beneficiary named in the will is the surviving spouse, then the property will pass to the surviving spouse. If the will lists other beneficiaries in addition to the surviving spouse, then only the property listed in the will that goes to the surviving spouse is subject to the petition. If there is no will, the community property can also be passed to the surviving spouse through the “Spousal Property Petition.” For the spousal property petition, the probate court will require that the probate form “1-DE-221, Spousal Property Petition”, be completed and signed by the surviving spouse. The petition will need to be supplemented with an explanation as to why the subject property should pass to the surviving spouse.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

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