Feb
08
2018
0

Proposition 58 Property Tax Exclusion -Transfer Between Parent and Child

A property tax re-assessment of the home in a transfer from a parent to a child can be avoided under California Proposition 58. For instance, when a probate is closed and the home is transferred to a child, or if the home is transferred to a child through trust administration, we can complete the “Claim For Reassessment Exclusion For Transfer Between Parent To Child.” If accepted by the assessor, the child who receives title to the real property through probate or the trust, can retain the parents’ old tax basis. Under Proposition 58, a son, daughter, child adopted before the age of 18, son-in-law, daughter–in-law and step-child, can be identified as the child. This re-assessment exclusion can be very valuable. For instance, the parents may have purchased their home some years ago for $85,000, and then leave their home to their daughter through probate or trust administration. When the parents die, their home could be worth $1,000,000. By utilizing Proposition 58, after the close of probate or trust administration, the daughter should be able to continue to pay property tax on the parents’ original tax basis of $85,000.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney, Michael J. Young.

Michael J. Young, Attorney at Law

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

Feb
07
2018
0

The Probate Spousal Property Petition

Assets that pass to a surviving spouse can be confirmed to the surviving spouse, through a petition process in probate court. This is not a full probate, and is called a “Spousal Property Petition”. This petition process usually takes around two months to complete, as opposed to around a year that is needed to complete a full probate. California Probate Code § 13500 provides for this petition process. The petition can be filed by a surviving spouse or surviving domestic partner. If a will exists, and the only beneficiary named in the will is the surviving spouse, then the property will pass to the surviving spouse. If the will lists other beneficiaries in addition to the surviving spouse, then only the property listed in the will that goes to the surviving spouse is subject to the petition. If there is no will, the community property can also be passed to the surviving spouse through the “Spousal Property Petition.” For the spousal property petition, the probate court will require that the probate form “1-DE-221, Spousal Property Petition”, be completed and signed by the surviving spouse. The petition will need to be supplemented with an explanation as to why the subject property should pass to the surviving spouse.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your Walnut Creek Probate Attorney.

Michael J. Young

Walnut Creek, CA Probate Attorney

1931 San Miguel Dr. Ste., 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

925-256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com

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