Apr
11
2017
0

How Much Are Probate Fees?

In California, Probate Code section 10810 statutorily sets the maximum amounts that executors and attorneys may be paid for their fees. The amount of attorney fees and executor fees are ordered by the court at the end of case. If the case is complicated, for instance where litigation is involved, the attorney can request that the court allow additional fees for the attorney’s extraordinary services.

The formula for calculating statutory fees for the attorney and for the executor are as follows: (1) Four percent for the first $100,000 of the estate; (2) Three percent for the next $100,000; (3) Two percent on the next eight hundred thousand dollars; (4) One percent on the next nine million dollars.

So for instance, if the amount probated is $100,000, the executor and the attorney can each be awarded $4,000 for their fees. If the amount probated is $200,000, the executor and the attorney can each be awarded $7,000 for their fees. The following chart reflects the statutory fees for the attorney and the executor for an estate with a value up to $5,000,000.

PROBATE ESTATE VALUES TOTAL ATTORNEY AND EXECUTOR FEES*
$100,000 $8,000
200,000 14,000
300,000 18,000
400,000 22,000
500,000 26,000
600,000 30,000
700,000 34,000
800,000 38,000
900,000 42,000
1,000,000 46,000
2,000,000 66,000
3,000,000 86,000
4,000,000 106,000
5,000,000 126,000

Please feel free to contact our office should you need help with a probate. This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Mar
31
2017
0

VA Benefit May Help Cover The Costs of In Home Care or an Assisted Living Facility

The Veteran’s Administration has a pension benefit known as Aid and Attendance, for the benefit of older, disabled war time veterans who have served at least one day in the service during an official wartime period. This benefit can help pay the costs of in home care, board and care and assisted living facilities. The benefit is also available to the surviving spouse of a wartime veteran.

These veterans are disabled due to “non-service connected reasons, which are usually age related. Their disabilities can result from diseases such Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, and from other physical disabilities. Another possible criteria for eligibility is that the veteran needs the attendance of another person in order to avoid the daily hazards of his environment. It must also be shown that the veteran is in need of assistance with various activities of daily living, such as bathing, dressing, eating, etc.

Eligibility for this benefit is also determined by income, and the amount of assets the veteran has. A large portion of the cost of care being paid for in home care or the assisted living facility, can usually be applied against the veteran’s income in the VA application, to make eligibility easier.

A single veteran can receive up to $1,749 per month, which is $20, 988 per year. A married veteran can receive up to $2,127 per month, which is $25,524 per year. In addition, the surviving spouse can receive up to $1,153 per month, which is $13,836 per year.

If you are a veteran, or if you have a family member or friend who is a veteran receiving care, you should seek the guidance of an experienced elder law attorney who is familiar with this benefit. The attorney can help you determine whether eligibility is possible, and what steps can be taken to obtain eligibility.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Mar
27
2017
0

How Much Can I Have In IRA’s and Still Qualify for Medi-Cal?

We are often asked the question as to how much you or your spouse can have in IRA’s and 401k’s and still qualify for Medi-Cal. The Medi-Cal applicant, or the ill spouse, can have any amount of IRA’s, 401k’s etc. These are so-called “qualified funds.” The only requirement is that the Medi-Cal applicant must be receiving periodic payments of some amount of principal and interest from these funds. Once this established, these qualified funds are considered exempt by Medi-Cal for qualification.

If the applicant is married, the well spouse can have any amount of IRA’s, 401k’s, etc., and there are no qualifications for distributions. So the qualified funds of the well spouse are totally exempt.

In addition, after the Medi-Cal applicant dies, the “qualified funds” of both spouses, are also exempt from recoupment by the state. As a result, the state will not go after your IRAs and 401k’s when you die.

In one of our recent cases, the ill spouse had approximately $100,000 in IRAs. The well spouse had approximately $300,000 in IRAs. The ill spouse was accepted for Medi-Cal.

There is a “share of cost” which is an amount the ill spouse must pay to the nursing home from the applicant’s income. We will review those rules in other blogs.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Mar
15
2017
0

Does Your Trust Have a Mandatory Bypass Provision?

Most modern Revocable Living Trusts do not have a Mandatory Bypass Provision, which is usually good planning. This provision is normally NOT necessary, and if you have one, it can cause unnecessary headaches after the first spouse dies. A mandatory bypass provision will require splitting and re-titling of the trust assets between a Revocable Survivor’s Trust and an Irrevocable Exemption Bypass Trust after the first spouse dies. You will need a tax I.D. number for the bypass trust, and a fiduciary tax return will need to be filed every year. The surviving spouse will also not have complete control of the assets in the irrevocable bypass trust. The mandatory bypass trust makes Medi-Cal qualification more difficult, because the state will require that you exhaust the assets of the bypass trust before you can qualify for Medi-Cal.

The primary purpose of a mandatory bypass provision in your revocable living trust is to save on death taxes, aka inheritance taxes. The current federal death tax exemption amount is $5.45 million per individual. So if you think you will have more than $5.45 million dollars after the first spouse dies, the mandatory bypass may be useful. Also, if the spouses have a blended family with “his mine and ours” children, the mandatory bypass trust can protect the assets of the children of the first spouse to die.

To avoid issues created by mandatory bypass provisions, you can instead have a discretionary bypass provision in your revocable living trust. This will provide the same results as a mandatory bypass, but will give the surviving spouse the discretion of funding a bypass trust for tax purposes. However, this funding must be completed within 9 months of the date of death of the first spouse to die. You should now check the provisions in your revocable living trust that tell you what to do after the first spouse dies. If the provisions call for a mandatory bypass trust and a split of the assets after the first to die, you may want to have the provision changed by your elder law attorney with an amendment. Most older trusts have a mandatory bypass provision, which should probably be changed.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Feb
24
2017
0

Springing vs. Immediate Financial Powers of Attorney

You should have a Financial Durable Power of Attorney (DPA) as part of your asset protection estate plan. This DPA allows your attorney in fact, such as your spouse or a child, to handle various financial matters and transactions for you. Categories of these powers include real estate, banking, financial institutions, retirement plans, trust activities, etc. The DPA should also include powers for your care if you become ill. In addition, the DPA can include powers for asset protection and Medi-Cal planning.

The Financial DPA is good during your lifetime only. It is not effective after you die. The term “Durable” means that the powers survive your incapacity. If you become incapacitated, the powers in the DPA continue to be effective.

Springing vs. Immediate Powers:

“SPRINGING”: The powers in the Financial DPA can become effective only upon your incapacity. This means that if you become incapacitated and cannot handle your own financial affairs, a “doctor’s note” will be required to activate the powers in the DPA. The powers will then “spring” into effect.

“IMMEDIATE”: The powers in the Financial DPA can become effective immediately upon your execution of the document. In this case, you will eliminate the requirement of a doctor’s note, confirming that you are incapacitated. The immediate DPA is useful between spouses, who want the convenience of being able to immediately help each other with their financial affairs. It is also very helpful between elderly parents and children who are actively involved with their parents’ care.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Feb
13
2017
0

Using An Annuity For Medi-Cal Eligibility For Spouses

In previous blogs, we have discussed various techniques, within the regulations, for obtaining Medi-Cal qualification for an ill spouse, when the couple has excess assets. These techniques include “spending down,” gifting and filing a court petition to obtain an order that allows the couple to keep all of their assets. In certain circumstances, especially between spouses, an annuity can be a useful tool to consider for Medi-Cal qualification.

As discussed in previous blogs, the ill spouse (Medi-Cal applicant) and the well spouse, can keep all of their qualified funds, like IRAs and 401(k)s, in any amounts, and still qualify for Medi-Cal. Then, the ill spouse cannot have more than $2,000 in non-qualified funds, like a savings or brokerage account in his name. The well spouse can have up to $120,900 in non-qualified funds in her name. So for instance, if the couple has $300,000 in non-qualified funds, they would have $177,100 too much for the ill spouse to qualify for Medi-Cal.

To use an annuity for qualification, the ill spouse would transfer his non-qualified assets to the well spouse. There is no Medi-Cal penalty for inter-spousal transfers. Then the well spouse would purchase an annuity with that money in her name, and name someone other than her ill spouse as the pay on death beneficiary of the annuity. Distributions would be made periodically from the annuity to the well spouse in payments scheduled to be exhausted during her life expectancy, pursuant to social security life expectancy tables. The well spouse can keep all of her income from the annuity, without penalty. In addition, as of January 1, 2017, there can be no recoupment by Medi-Cal against the annuity after the ill spouse passes away, because a pay on death beneficiary has been named in the annuity. This technique is not appropriate in all situations, and may be discussed with your elder law attorney along with other options.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Feb
02
2017
0

2017 MEDI-CAL DESK REFERENCE

2017 MEDI-CAL DESK REFERENCE

Divestment Penalty Divisor $8,189.00
Individual Resource Allowance $2,000.00
Monthly Personal Needs Allowance $35.00
Community Spouse Resource
Allowance $120,900.00
Monthly Maintenance Needs
Allowance $3,023.00
Resource Allowance for a Couple
(Husband and Wife both in facility) $2,000.00/each

MICHAEL J. YOUNG, ATTORNEY AT LAW

Elder Law Planning, Estate Planning, Trusts, Probate, Real Estate,

Preservation of Assets, Long Term Care Planning

Member: National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, Inc.

1931 San Miguel Drive, Suite 220

Walnut Creek, CA 94596

E-mail: LawYoung1@Gmail.com Phone: (925) 256-0298

www.WalnutCreekElderLaw.com Fax:     (925) 938-6727

Jan
30
2017
0

Do not Listen To Your Neighbors Regarding Medi-Cal Eligibility

Do not listen to your neighbors regarding Medi-Cal eligibility! Over the last number of days, we have been told by several individuals who are interested in our services, that their understanding is that they would never qualify for Medi-Cal based upon “advice” they received from their neighbors. In each case, the advice was wrong.

One person told me that she was told that her husband would not qualify for Medi-Cal because his IRAs were too high. I told her that her husband can have any amount of IRAs and still qualify for Medi-Cal. In fact, I told her that she, as the well spouse, can also have any amount of IRAs, and her husband could still qualify for Medi-Cal.  In addition, I told her that both her and her husband’s IRAs cannot be collected against by the State for Medi-Cal recoupment.

In another case, an individual told me that she was informed that she could not qualify for Medi-Cal because she owned her own home. This information is also incorrect. All she has to do is express a subjective intent in writing that she intends to return home, even if she is in a nursing home. We prepare that documentation for our clients as part of their estate plan. This intent to return home is also confirmed on the Medi-Cal application. In addition, I told her that as of January 1, 2017, her home cannot be collected against by the State for Medi-Cal recoupment, if her home is in her revocable living trust at the time of her death.

In another case, a person told me that he understood that he could not qualify for Medi-Cal because his and his wife’s income was too high. This advice is also erroneous because of the Medi-Cal rules regarding Share of Cost. The state pays qualified nursing homes $8,189 a month for a Medi-Cal recipient, minus a share of cost from the recipient. The $8,189 is usually much lower than a nursing home would be if you were to private pay. The recipient’s income goes to a share of cost to the nursing home, up to $8,189, minus a few small deductions from the recipient’s income. If the recipient is married, the well spouse can keep all of her income, without penalty. If the well spouse makes under $2,981 per month, the ill spouse’s income is allocated to the well spouse’s income to bring her up to $2,981 per month. As a result, many of our clients end up paying a very small share of cost, and sometimes nothing, to the nursing home.

The moral of the story is, do not listen to your neighbors regarding Medi-Cal eligibility.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Dec
21
2016
0

Medi-Cal Recovery Will Be Limited to Probate Estates after January 1, 2017

We have recently blogged about the new legislation Governor Brown signed, effective January 1, 2017, which changes the rules regarding recovery by the state for payments it has made to nursing homes for Medi-Cal recipients. Under the old law, the only way we could avoid recovery was to ensure that there was nothing in the Medi-Cal recipient’s name at the date of his death. Under the new law, for Medi-Cal recipients who die after January 1, 2017, recovery will be limited to those estates that are subject to probate under California Probate Law. Assets transferred from a revocable living trust of the Medi-Cal recipient will not be subject to recovery under California Law, because assets in a revocable living trust are not be subject to probate.

For example, if Mary the Medi-Cal recipient leaves her home to her son in her will, the home will be subject to a probate. If the state paid $30,000 to a nursing home for Mary, the state will be able to recover the $30,000 from the probate of the home. If the home was in Mary’s revocable living trust at the time of her death, the state will not be able to recover against the home, because the home will transfer from the trust to Mary’s son, and will not be probated.

The new rules, effective for Medi-Cal recipients who die after January 1, 2017, also exempt certain assets from state recovery. For example, property transferred prior to death, that are no longer in the beneficiary’s name, are not subject to recovery. However, any transfers must be made within the Medi-Cal regulations in order to avoid periods of ineligibility when applying for Medi-Cal. Also, the state cannot recover against your life insurance policy as long as you name one or more beneficiaries under your policy. If you do not name a beneficiary, or if the beneficiary you have named dies before you do, there will be a probate to determine who the beneficiary is. The state will be able to recover against the probate.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

Dec
08
2016
0

John Hancock Has Dropped Traditional Long Term Care Insurance – But All Is Not Lost!

Forbes Magazine has recently reported that John Hancock is the latest insurance company to drop out of the traditional long term care insurance market. John Hancock has been one of the largest providers over the years, having sold some 1.2 million traditional long term care insurance policies. It is estimated that there are now less than 20 companies that are selling these traditional “use it or lose it” style of policies. Forbes says that, “This withdrawal signals what many financial planners, government officials, and financial service firms have known for years—that the United States is nearing a long-term care planning crisis.”

The reason that so many insurance companies have dropped out of the traditional long term care insurance market is because they are losing money on this type of policy. The insurance companies set initial premiums too low and they underestimated how long people would live. They also underestimated the cost of long term care and how much the cost of that care would increase over time.

Fortunately however, there are new insurance options that you can explore to help pay for your long term care. In 2010, an amendment to the Pension Protection Act (PPA) of 2006 was passed which can be very advantageous to Americans struggling to find ways to pay for long term care. As an example, many seniors own annuity contracts. Individuals who own annuities can now exchange those annuities, on a tax free basis, for Pension Protection Act style annuities that have long term care riders. The long term care rider in the new annuity contract can create multiples of the amount in the annuity that can be used for your care. For instance, $100,000 moving from your existing annuity into a Pension Protection Act style of annuity could create $300,000 in a rider to be used for your care. If you need help with two out of the six activities of daily living, you can “go on claim,” and the amounts distributed to you from the annuity for your care are distributed tax free.

You can also transfer money from any source into a Pension Protection Act style annuity or life insurance policy that has a long term care rider. The healthier you are, the easier it is for you to qualify for these new financial instruments. However, they are easier to qualify for than traditional long term care insurance policies because you are using your own assets to fund the long term care annuity or life insurance policy.

While you are updating your estate planning documents for long term care planning and asset protection with us, and if you are interested, we can help you explore these Pension Protection Act asset protection possibilities with you.

This information is not to be taken as legal advice, and you are encouraged to see your elder law attorney. At the Law Offices of Michael J. Young, at 1931 San Miguel Dr., Ste. 220, Walnut Creek, CA www.WalnutCreekElderLaw, 925-256-0298, lawyoung1@gmail.com, we practice Elder Law and we help Baby Boomers, Seniors and families through their Elder Care Journey. We help families with long-term care planning, asset-protection plans, comprehensive estate planning, wills, trusts and powers of attorney. We also help the older client and their families get their “Ducks in a Row” in order help them qualify for Medi-Cal and the VA Aid & Attendance Improved Pension benefit.

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